DuPont embarks on $12M project

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    DuPont Pioneer’s Judith Rivera, Sarah Styan and Brad McAvoy adjourn from the site of the firm’s $12 million shade house project in Kekaha Friday.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Shovels frame the site where DuPont Pioneer will embark on a $12 million project involving the erection of 24 shade houses for research and development in Kekaha.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Dignitaries including DuPont Pioneer’s Fred Humphrey, governor’s liaison Carrice Gardner, DuPont Pioneer’s Ryan Oyama, Mark Takemoto, Judith Rivera, Kauai Council Chair Mel Rapozo, Earthworks’ Scott Sheldon and Mayor Bernard Carvalho Jr. get together for a photo Friday after turning the ground on DuPont Pioneer’s $12 million shade house project in Kekaha.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Dignitaries including DuPont Pioneer’s Fred Humphreys, governor’s liaison Carrice Gardner, DuPont Pioneer’s Ryan Oyama, Mark Takemoto, Judith Rivera, Kauai County Council Chair Mel Rapozo, Earthworks’ Scott Sheldon and Mayor Bernard Carvalho Jr. turn dirt Friday at the site of DuPont Pioneer’s $12 million shade house project in Kekaha.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Dignitaries, including DuPont Pioneer’s Fred Humphrey, governor’s liaison Carrice Gardner, DuPont Pioneer’s Ryan Oyama, Mark Takemoto, Judith Rivera, Kauai County Council Chair Mel Rapozo, Earthworks’ Scott Sheldon, and Mayor Bernard Carvalho Jr. demonstrate aloha following groundbreaking Friday at the Kekaha site for the $12 million DuPont Pioneer shade house project.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Shovels used for groundbreaking ceremonies Friday frame DuPont Pioneer’s Fred Humphrey and Earthworks’ Scott Sheldon, who tour the site where 24 shade houses will be erected in Kekaha.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Jeff Fisher of Earthworks discusses the site layout for the 24 shade houses with Kauai County Council Chair Mel Rapozo following the groundbreaking ceremonies for the $12 million project Friday at the DuPont Pioneer Kekaha site.

KEKAHA — Judith Rivera, Hawaii Research Lead for DuPont Pioneer, said without the project, the facilities at the DuPont Pioneer Kekaha Parent Seed location would probably have been abandoned.

Friday, Rivera was joined by other DuPont Pioneer leaders and representatives from the state and county in breaking ground on its shade house in Kekaha.

“This is an important project for both the company and the community,” Rivera said. “It’s also important because this project could not work in any other place. We worked with our community partners to develop this and bring agriculture to a new way of doing things.”

The new structures will increase capacity and incorporate more efficient technologies, according to a DuPont Pioneer release. The expansions and improvements are estimated at $12.5 million and will enhance the DuPont Pioneer Waimea Research Center, and the former DuPont Pioneer Kekaha Parent Seed location, which are part of the research network.

The groundbreaking comes after the company received approval for the project from the state’s Department of Agriculture in late January.

“This project will expand our capacity to conduct research operations indoors, providing environmental benefits, and reducing the need for additional lands,” Rivera said.

During the first phase of the project, four new structures will be built. Additional structures, to a total of 24, will be built over the next few years. Other improvements are also planned, including renovations to the office building in Kekaha to create more work areas.

Ryan Oyama, a research scientist with DuPont Pioneer, said the shade house technology would help their work, eliminating the possibility of specimen being rained out.

“Weather is unpredictable,” Rivera said. “We have worked with Kauai Coffee Company and our Kunia facility with this technology, and we are happy to have been approved by the state.”

Council Chair Mel Rapozo expressed his elation over the project.

“Agriculture is ahead of tourism,” he said. “Agriculture goes back to our forefathers who came to Hawaii because of agriculture, laboring in the plantations. Being here demonstrates that we made the right decisions and reassures us the agricultural companies are not leaving. We owe this to our ancestors who came here and built on agriculture.”

5 Comments
  1. Lawaibob February 17, 2018 8:14 am Reply

    Rapozo should change his mayoral campaign motto to “I Love Pesticides”


  2. Steve Martin February 17, 2018 9:54 am Reply

    Let’s get rid of all the seed and pesticide business and grow industrial hemp. That would be the win win for all involved . We have to many of these companies in the pockets of politicians.


  3. avcwbcoach February 17, 2018 1:32 pm Reply

    How much of the 12 million goes toward managing the toxic run off into Kauai waters of Dupont’s toxic GMO waste? How much will it cost to replace the land they kill with these kine experiments? Could we request Councilman Rapozo answer these questions, factually, of course!


  4. Kauairosina February 18, 2018 3:59 pm Reply

    “We owe this to our ancestors who came here and built on agriculture.”

    What a wild statement!! Our ancestors would approve of fields of genetically modified crops which require horrible poisons and furthermore do not contribute to our daily food.

    I don’t think so.


  5. DINKYDAO February 19, 2018 6:36 pm Reply

    Same people commenting on subject matter unbeknownst to them. GMO is not equal to pesticides. One is a result of fast paced genetics while the other is used to describe a chemical (inorganic or organic) to rid undesirables. Would like to know what GMO waste is and how toxic it is. Seriously, I have found that an empty can makes more noise than a full one.


Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, send us an email.