How safe is your keiki car seat?

  • Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island

    Dave Sharma of the Kaua‘i District Health Office watches as Shelly Waiolama of the Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children does a final check of the child car seat installation, Thursday during the free car seat inspections at the Wilcox Medical Center.

  • Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island

    Shelly Waiolama and Lisa Dau of the Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children check on the expiration date and recalls on a car seat, Thursday during the free car seat inspections at the Wilcox Medical Center.

  • Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island

    Dave Sharma of the Kaua‘i District Health Office listens while Lisa Dau explains the car seat’s security attachments while Shelly Waiolama checks the security harness, Thursday during the free car seat inspections at the Wilcox Medical Center.

  • Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island

    Car seat inspector Shelly Waiolama of the Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children checks a car seat for stability and secureness during the free keiki car seat inspections at the Wilcox Medical Center. Note the twisted seat belt securing the car seat that indicates an improper installation.

  • Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island

    Certified car seat inspectors Lisa Dau and Shelly Waiolama of the Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children stand with the replacement car seats, Thursday during the free keiki car seat inspections at the Wilcox Medical Center.

LIHU‘E — Certified Child Car Seat inspector Lisa Dau from the Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children said a new law pertaining to child passenger restraint was passed in July, and it’s beneficial for users of keiki car seats and boosters to have their equipment checked for not only compliance with the new law, but also for safety effectiveness.

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