Mexico sees jungle lakes evaporate amid lower rainfall

  • In this photo provided by Mexico’s National Commission for Protected Nature Areas, people work to rescue a young crocodile and other wildlife from the receding waters of the Metzabok Lagoon in the Lacandon jungle of Chiapas State in southern Mexico, in the first half of August, 2019. In recent days, indigenous Lacandones, who depend on tourism, fish and water from the jungle lakes, worked furiously with biologists to capture and transfer crocodiles, fish and turtles from the dried-up lake to nearby ones that still have water. (CONANP via AP)

  • In this photo provided by Mexico’s National Commission for Protected Nature Areas, the diminishing waters of the Metzabok Lagoon are seen amidst its drying lake bed, in the Lacandon jungle of Chiapas State in southern Mexico, in the first half of August, 2019. During the month of August, the Metzabok lake, which normally covers 220 acres (89 hectares), dried up completely, leaving cracked mud where the surrounding jungle used to reflect in the translucent waters and Lacandon Indians traveled by canoe. (CONANP via AP)

MEXICO CITY — Some of the mystical blue-green lakes of the Lacandon jungle in southern Mexico are drying up this year, the result of what experts say is an extended drought and rising temperatures in the region.

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