In Carolinas, a question as the rivers rise: Stay or go?

  • U.S. Coast Guard rescue swimmer Samuel Knoeppel, top, and Randy Haba, bottom left, talk to Willie Schubert of Pollocksville, N.C., as he is rescued from a rooftop in Pollocksville, Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

  • In this Sunday afternoon, Sept 16, 2018 photo, Waheeda Reese and her daughter, Anissa, pack up the car to leave their home in a mandatory evacuation area in Fayetteville, N.C., barely making the 3 p.m. deadline officials set for residents to leave the area. The Cape Fear River runs about a quarter-mile from their subdivision, and police cars have been circling through demanding over the loud speaker that they evacuate. Waheeda was hesitant to leave her home as the floodwaters rose, and Anissa had tried to convince her for days it was time. (AP Photo/Claire Galofaro)

  • In this Sunday afternoon, Sept 16, 2018 photo, Waheeda Reese watches it rain from a window in her home in a mandatory evacuation area in Fayetteville, N.C. The Cape Fear River that runs about a quarter-mile away from her subdivision is expected to crest Tuesday, and authorities have ordered people within a mile of its banks to get out immediately. (AP Photo/Claire Galofaro)

  • In this Sunday afternoon, Sept 16, 2018 photo, Mary Ingram checks the news on her phone outside a convenience store in Spring Lake, N.C, about a mile from where the Little River runs. Officials warn that the river is likely to pour from its banks and inundate towns in Cumberland County. Ingram lives just outside the mandatory evacuation zone, and was growing worried about the rising water. (AP Photo/Claire Galofaro)

  • Floodwaters from Hurricane Florence inundates homes in Pollocksville, N.C., Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

  • Members of the U.S. Coast Guard Shallow Water Rescue Team check on a flooded neighborhood in Lumberton, N.C., Monday, Sept. 17, 2018, in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. — The river seethed a quarter-mile away, bulging from its banks, so the patrol cars circled the neighborhood three times.

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