Bellstone believed missing is at Kauai Museum

  • Bethany Freudenthal/The Garden Island Photo of the Bellstone site from the bottom of the hill. Alalem said in ancient times it wasn't overgrown and you could see all the way from the site on the mountain down to where the birthing place is.
  • Bethany Freudenthal/The Garden Island

    As kahu of this area for decades, Jim Alalem said he single handedly re-erected these idols that were toppled during the time of Kaahumanu. He’s no longer caring for the area as he did when he was younger because he said others who claim to be descendants took over the work. Alalem said he is supportive of what Kimberly Souza is doing at the Bellstone as a religious practitioner.

    Bethany Freudenthal/The Garden Island

    As kahu of this area for decades, Jim Alalem said he single handedly re-erected these idols that were toppled during the time of Kaahumanu. He’s no longer caring for the area as he did when he was younger because he said others who claim to be descendants took over the work. Alalem said he is supportive of what Kimberly Souza is doing at the Bellstone as a religious practitioner.

  • Bethany Freudenthal/The Garden Island

    When a child was born the kahuna of the area would announce whether the baby was a boy or a girl, then a runner would run up to the bellstone which would be rung with different tones whether the baby was a boy or a girl.

  • Bethany Freudenthal/ The Garden Island

    The Pohaku Kani, (Bellstone), that’s on display at the Kauai Museum.

A bellstone believed by some to be missing from a sacred site on Kauai apparently isn’t missing at all, according to the state.

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