5 dead after tornado, flooding from central US storms

  • A crowd of onlookers take photographs of the rising level of the Ohio River as it encroaches the barrier wall at Smothers Park on Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, in Owensboro, Ky. Forecasters warned people living along rivers, streams and creeks in southern Ohio, southeastern Indiana and northern Kentucky to be especially cautious and prepared for rapid rises. (Greg Eans/The Messenger-Inquirer via AP)

  • The flood waters are receding but there still areas where the water is very high, Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 in Lansing, Mich. (Robert Killips /Lansing State Journal via AP)

  • Gio Rodriguez, 8, sits outside his home as his parents clean up debris Sunday morning after a fierce storm hit Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, in the Farmington subdivision in Clarksville, Tenn. A strong storm system that included possible tornadoes roared eastward through the central United States, leaving demolished homes, damaged vehicles and uprooted trees in its wake. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP)

  • People work to clear debris Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, after a fierce storm hit Saturday in the Farmington subdivision in Clarksville, Tenn. A strong storm system that included possible tornadoes roared eastward through the central United States, leaving demolished homes, damaged vehicles and uprooted trees in its wake. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP)

  • Neighbors help collect clothing and look for pets at a destroyed home Sunday morning after a fierce storm hit Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018, in the Farmington subdivision in Clarksville, Tenn. A strong storm system that included possible tornadoes roared eastward through the central United States, leaving demolished homes, damaged vehicles and uprooted trees in its wake. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP)

  • A teddy bear lies among the debris Sunday, Feb. 25, 2018, after a fierce storm hit Saturday in the Farmington subdivision in Clarksville, Tenn. A strong storm system that included possible tornadoes roared eastward through the central United States, leaving demolished homes, damaged vehicles and uprooted trees in its wake. (Lacy Atkins/The Tennessean via AP)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The death toll rose to at least five on Sunday after severe thunderstorms swept through the central U.S., spawning a tornado that flattened homes, gale force winds and widespread flooding from the Upper Midwest to Appalachia.

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