Letters for Friday, September 15, 2017

• Some possibilities for Mahaulepu goo • Climate change opportunities may rise

Some possibilities for Mahaulepu goo

Some time in the late 1960s a family that lived in Koloa, which included several Kupuna members, invited my family to a picnic at Mahaulepu. After eating, we went for a walk and found deposits of Bunker Oil in various spots along the shoreline.

When I asked my hosts about those deposits of Bunker Oil, their reply was that such clusters of oil had been washing up on the Mahaulepu shore since World War II ended, (1945). They supposed that some kind military action was the cause.

Therefore:

1. Bunker Oil has been washing up on the Mahaulepu shoreline for several decades, and,

2. Perhaps there is some kind of ocean-going vessel that is a rusting hulk off the Mahaulepu shoreline which sporadically “belches” out Bunker Oil in a manner similar to that of the Arizona Memorial.

Richard W. Coller, Kapaa

Climate change opportunities may rise

Obviously not all the Trump Administration denies climate change. This CSCE.gov report on “Taming the OSCE’s Least-Developed Region: the Arctic” reads, in part:

(Environmental challenges) – The way that the Arctic nations respond to the changing climate and its respective perils and possibilities will shape the world’s response to climate change and the future of international cooperation. Science and technology in the Arctic present opportunities for this collaboration.

(Economic Opportunities) – In the near future, there likely will be a significant rise in human activity along the Northern Route. As sea ice melts, new shipping lanes are opening up offering unprecedented access to trade routes, natural resources, and even tourism opportunities.

The Coast Guard’s oldest icebreaker and only one capable of heavy icebreaking, the POLAR STAR, was commissioned in 1976 and is operating well past its intended service life.

Other Arctic nations, including Canada, Sweden, Finland and Demark have limited icebreaking capability as well. Russia currently owns and operates a fleet of more than 40 icebreakers.

Makes me wonder about that half-a-trillion-dollar deal Tillerson struck with Putin before the Magnitsky Act. More than 40 icebreakers?

Susan Oakley, Kapaa

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