Bulletin Board

Senior parent night

Tuesday, Kapa‘a High School

From 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Kapa‘a High School library parents and guardians of seniors are invited to an informative presentation. Here is an opportunity for parents to meet the teachers from each department. The evening’s agenda will include information regarding PTSA membership and activities, review of General Learner Outcomes (GLO), class level activities and career and college planning presented by counselors. Each grade level is scheduled to attend the upcoming parent meetings: Tuesday for seniors; Sept. 16 for juniors; Sept. 23 for sophomores and Sept. 30 for freshmen. Enter library from the high school side.

For more information call Robyn at 821-4401, Ext. 129.

Informational meeting

Kaua‘i High School

Kaua‘i High School, in partnership with PAIRS-PTSA, will host an informational meeting for seniors and their parents and guardians. Join them at 6:30 p.m. in the school cafeteria on Sept. 22. It will be the first of two meetings planned for this school year to help prepare seniors and their families for their last year in high school. The second meeting will take place in the spring of 2009.

Important information that will be shared includes graduation requirements, preparing for life after graduation, graduation supply orders, upcoming senior events and what’s being planned for graduation. The evening will end with a glimpse of “Project Graduation 2009,” an all-night after graduation celebration sponsored by PAIRS-PTSA and supported by generous individuals, organizations and companies throughout the community. Most presenters will be available at the conclusion of the meeting to answer questions on specific concerns of individual attendees. For more information call the Parent Community Networking Center on campus at 274-3176.

Language assistance

improves in Hawai‘i

Presentation

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’, Office for Civil Rights and the Hawai‘i Department of Human Services have signed a voluntary agreement to improve language assistance services for limited English proficient persons in Hawai‘i.

Hawai‘i DHS administers a $1.7 billion annual budget to coordinate and provide specific benefits and services throughout the state, such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, child care, child and adult protective services, vocational rehabilitation services for people with disabilities and Medicaid health insurance.

Hawai‘i DHS receives federal funds from HHS and is required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and implementing regulations to, among other things, take reasonable steps to provide meaningful access to its programs by LEP persons who are eligible to receive Hawai‘i DHS services and benefits.

This agreement will help improve access for LEP persons to Hawai‘i DHS services. By enhancing its ability to provide human services to eligible LEP persons, Hawai‘i also improves its ability, consistent with HHS objectives, to prepare for emergencies and respond to disasters.

Hawai‘i Gov. Linda Lingle said the voluntary agreement is in keeping with her administration’s commitment to improving services for people with limited English proficiency.

Federal survey

cards help fund

public schools

Last Tuesday Hawai‘i’s public school students brought home a federal census survey card for parents to complete and promptly return to their schools. The returned cards qualify the public schools for more than $40 million in federal funds.

The annual survey determined the number of military and non-military federally connected students in the public school system for whom the state receives impact aid funds under Public Law 103-382. These funds provide partial reimbursement to the state for local tax loss resulting from tax-free federal installations or property.

“By filling out and returning the survey cards, parents help our schools claim and benefit from Hawai‘i’s authorized share of federal support,” said Superintendent Patricia Hamamoto. “Parents are encouraged to complete and return the cards.”

Each survey card is important because federal impact aid is determined from the survey card responses. Hawai‘i’s public schools receive funding for military and non-military connected students.

During the 2006-07 schools year, the state counted more than 29,000 federally connected students and received nearly $47 million in federal impact aid, or an average of $1,587 per student. This represents about 13.6 percent of the state’s average per pupil expenditure of $11,659 (2006-07).

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, send us an email.