Kaumualii wanted a huge diamond

In old Hawaii, the fragrant wood of the iliahi tree, called sandalwood, was merely burned as firewood or mixed with coconut oil to perfume kapa.

Hawaiian Canneries Co. of Kapaa closes

Hawaiian Canneries Co., which cultivated pineapple on 3,400 acres scattered over 35 miles from Hanamaulu to Hanalei, and processed and canned its pineapple at Kapaa canneries, now the site of Pono Kai Resort, shut down in 1962 after being in business for nearly 50 years.

Gloria Rapozo recalls baking Portuguese bread

In July 1973, Gloria Rapozo of Hanamaulu Camp reminisced about baking Portuguese bread in a brick oven, which was still standing within a splintered shed in the camp, but was then unusable.

Kauai Governor Paul Puhiula Kanoa

Paul Puhiula Kanoa (1832-1895), Kauai’s governor from 1881 to 1886 during the reign of King David Kalakaua, was an alii — his parents being Kaaikaulehelehe and Kapau, and his hanai father, with whom he is sometimes mistaken for, was Paulo Kanoa, the governor of Kauai from 1846 to 1877.

1946 Sakada Napoleon Comisap

When the Japanese Army invaded the Philippines in December 1941, Napoleon Comisap (1916-2000) – then residing in Laoag City with his wife, Dionisia, and infant daughter, Esmeralda – was called up by the 3rdBattalion, 13thInfantry Regiment, Philippine Army.

A History of Kauai’s Halfway Bridge

Long ago on Kauai, when Native Hawaiians travelled along a trail that once crossed Huleia Stream where Halfway Bridge was later erected, they would stop before wading across to leave an offering they believed would ensure their safe passage into the domain of another demigod.

Kauai-born Theosophist Augustus Francis Knudsen

Born at Kekaha, Kauai, Augustus Francis Knudsen (1869-1944) was the son of Valdemar Knudsen, who in 1856 was appointed by Kamehameha IV as curator of royal cattle herds on leased lands encompassing over 100,000 acres.

Eric Moir’s childhood memories recalled

Born and raised in Poipu, construction contractor and Kauai historian Eric Moir (1931-1996) was the son of Hector Moir, the manager of Koloa Plantation from 1933 to 1948, while his mother, Alexandria Kundsen Moir, was the daughter of Kauai’s “Teller of Hawaiian Tales,” Eric Knudsen.

Kauai’s coldest recorded temperatures recalled

In February 1917, William Hardy, the territorial hydrographic official on Kauai, reported that the temperature at Kokee during the latter part of January had plummeted to a freezing 32 degrees.

Hawaiian Centenarian Kaapu Kolo (1801-1920)

Born on Niihau in 1801, Kaapu Kolo was a young girl when she, her parents and others would sometimes stand on the beaches of Niihau to watch with wonder as strange foreign vessels with great sails glided past their island home.

A History of Lihue Hospital

Kauai’s first hospital, a 20-bed facility, was built in Koloa by Koloa Plantation sometime during the 1880s.

The notorious Honorato-Gasmen feud

The deadly feud between Honorato and Gasmen families of Kauai, which that took place on Kauai between 1976 and 1995, originated when George Honorato testified against Rojelio Gasmen for Gasmen’s part in a 1976 Nawiliwili shooting incident that resulted in Gasmen being sentenced to five years in prison.

Strange happenings at the Pacific Missile Range

When Navy Lt. Cmdr. Bruce Rolfe and his wife, Cora, moved into their quarters at 1204-B Regulus Drive at Kauai’s Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) in the early 1980s, they began to experience unexplainable phenomenon.

Hawaiian singer and steel guitarist Annie Kerr

Trina Elizabeth Sonoda of Wailua, my son Brett’s fiancée, recently told me that she is the great-great-grandniece of Hawaiian singer and steel guitarist Annie Kerr (1906-1967).

Ginger Beralas’ oopu fishing days on the North Shore

My wife, Ginger, was born and raised on Kauai, and during the 1950s and early 1960s she’d often go fishing with her family — at the seashore, in plantation reservoirs or steams in the mountains, or in the Hanalei and Wainiha rivers.