Mosquito-survey teams track avian malaria

  • Contributed by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources

    Dr. Lisa “Cali” Crampton, the Kaua‘i Forest Bird Recovery Project project leader, describes the impact climate change has on the mosquito population, and in turn their effect on native-bird populations.

  • Contributed by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources

    Kaua‘i Forest Bird Recovery Project Field Associate Allie Cabrera check standing water for mosquito larvae.

  • Contributed by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources

    Teams use two types of traps to catch mosquitos. One is a carbon-dioxide trap that attracts blood-seeking female mosquitos, and the other, pictured here, is called a gravid trap, which uses a stinky-water solution to trap mosquitoes ready to lay eggs.

  • Contributed by the state Department of Land and Natural Resources

    Dr. Lisa “Cali” Crampton, the Kaua‘i Forest Bird Recovery Project project leader, left, and Kaua‘i Forest Bird Recovery Project field associate Allie Cabrera, check standing water for mosquito larvae.

KOKE‘E — Allie Cabrera describes herself as the “queen of the road,” due to her almost-daily trips from Lihu‘e to Koke‘e State Park, and onto the Camp 10 Road. She could also be described as the current Kaua‘i “queen of mosquito trapping.”

0 Comments