Feathers fit for a king reside in the Kaua‘i Museum

  • Laurel Smith / The Garden Island

    Kaua‘i Museum Executive Director Chucky Boy Chockstands at the center of the museum’s collection.

  • Laurel Smith / The Garden Island

    Feathers adorn the museum’s foyer. Traditionally red coloring represents the wearer’s royal bloodline and yellow represents nobility.

  • Laurel Smith / The Garden Island

    Fruit of the papala kepau glistens with a sticky glue like coating outside the Kaua‘i Museum. The pāpala kēpau was a common method for snaring mountaintop birds whose feathers were needed to decorate regalia. Now, Chock checks the tree frequently to see if there are any birds are trapped and need to be freed.

  • Laurel Smith / The Garden Island

    Several of the museum’s paintings illustrated the importance of these cloaks that were traditionally only worn by Hawaiian royalty.

  • Laurel Smith / The Garden Island

    Kaua‘i Museum Executive Director Chucky Boy Chock talks story about one of his favorite items in the museum’s collection, a replica of a cloak worn by Kaumuali‘i, the last ruling chief of Kaua‘i and Ni‘hau. The Replica was made in 2015 by master featherworker Rick San Nicolas.

A cloak, helmet and cape befitting royalty are on display in the Kaua‘i Museum on Rice Street.

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