Newspaper criticizes film’s take on Olympic bombing coverage

  • In this image released by Warner Bros. Pictures, director Clint Eastwood speaks with actor Paul Walter Hauser as they work during the filming of the movie “Richard Jewell.” When a bomb exploded in a downtown Atlanta park midway through the 1996 Olympics, it set news reporters and law enforcement on a collision course that upended the life of a security guard, turning him from hero to villain overnight. Now, more than 20 years later, a recent book and upcoming movie explore Jewell’s ordeal and the roles played by law enforcement and the media. (Claire Folger/Warner Bros. Pictures via AP)

  • In this July 28, 1996, file photo, security guard Richard Jewell poses across from the tower where he found a bomb and warned visitors at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. When a bomb exploded in a downtown Atlanta park midway through the 1996 Olympics, it set news reporters and law enforcement on a collision course that upended the life of a security guard, turning him from hero to villain overnight. Now, more than 20 years later, a recent book and upcoming movie explore Jewell’s ordeal and the roles played by law enforcement and the media. (William Berry/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, File)

ATLANTA — After a bomb exploded in a downtown Atlanta park midway through the 1996 Olympics, a security guard initially cast as a hero was transformed into a villain virtually overnight. More than 20 years later, a movie to be released later this week, “Richard Jewell,” explores the roles played by law enforcement and the media in the guard’s ordeal.

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