Costco recalls Three Berry Blend due to contamination

  • COURTESY FDA

    Costco is recalling its Kirkland Signature Three Berry Blend sold by Townsend Farms Inc.

Costco shoppers are being alerted to a possible health risk if they recently bought the Kirkland Signature Three Berry Blend. Costco is recallling the product.

“Out of an abundance of caution, Townsend Farms, Inc. has notified Costco that a recent FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) test indicated that a domestic conventional frozen blackberry product manufactured by Townsend Farms, Inc., may be contaminated with Hepatitis A,” according to a press release.

Townsend Farms, Inc. used the domestic conventional frozen blackberry to manufacture the Kirkland Signature Three Berry Blend product with Best By Dates between February 16, 2020, and May 4, 2020.

Costco only sold the product in stores located in San Diego and Los Angeles and Hawaii. No product manufactured for Costco by Townsend Farms has tested positive for Hepatitis A. Costco has no product in its current inventory. Costco has been notifying its members about the potential health risk.

According to the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control, there have been no customer illness reports to date related to any product manufactured by Townsend Farms, Inc., using these blackberries.

Members who have purchased the above product should not consume it. Instead, photograph the product bag for your records, dispose of the product and contact your local Costco for a full refund.

Costco members who have questions should contact Townsend Farms, Inc., customer service representatives at 877-244- 0947 or by email at TownsendFarms4283@stericycle.com.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from exposure to the Hepatitis A virus, including from food. It can range from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious illness lasting several months. Illness generally occurs within 15 to 50 days of exposure and includes fatigue, abdominal pain, jaundice, abnormal liver tests, dark urine and pale stool. Hepatitis A vaccination can prevent illness if given within two weeks of exposure to a contaminated food. In rare cases, particularly consumers who have a pre-existing severe illness or are immune compromised, hepatitis A infection can progress to liver failure. Persons who may have consumed affected product should consult with their health care professional or local health department to determine if a vaccination is appropriate, and consumers with symptoms of hepatitis A should contact their health care professionals or the local health department immediately.

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