D-Day’s 75th anniversary renews interest in some classrooms

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 11th grade students learn about the D-Day invasion at Normandy during an advanced placement history class at Crossroads FLEX school in Cary, N.C. Its 75th anniversary brings extra classroom attention to D-Day, which has waned as a topic that’s emphasized in schools across the world. In a North Carolina classroom, students learn about spies, the deadly military practice before D-Day and a general who kept his plans “on the down low.” (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 11th grade students learn about the D-Day invasion at Normandy during a history class at Crossroads FLEX school in Cary, N.C. Its 75th anniversary brings extra classroom attention to D-Day, which has waned as a topic that’s emphasized in schools across the world. In a North Carolina classroom, students learn about spies, the deadly military practice before D-Day and a general who kept his plans “on the down low.” (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

  • In this photo taken Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, Zane Taylor and other students use virtual reality technology to learn about the D-Day invasion at Normandy during a history class at Crossroads FLEX school in Cary, N.C. Its 75th anniversary brings extra classroom attention to D-Day, which has waned as a topic that’s emphasized in schools across the world. In a North Carolina classroom, students learn about spies, the deadly military practice before D-Day and a general who kept his plans “on the down low.” (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

RALEIGH, N.C. — Kasey Turcol has just 75 minutes to explain to her high school students the importance of D-Day — and if this wasn’t the 75th anniversary of the turning point in World War II, she wouldn’t devote that much time to it. D-Day is not part of the required curriculum in North Carolina — or in many other states.

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