Remains of Pearl Harbor sailors return home after 77 years

  • FILE - In this July 7, 2018 file photo, U.S. Navy sailors fold the U.S. flag draped over the casket with the remains of Seaman First Class Leon Arickx at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Osage, Iowa. Arickx’ remains, which were unidentifiable after his death after the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor in 1941, were identified through DNA testing earlier this year. More than three-quarters of a century after the devastating attack killed nearly 2,400 in Hawaii, the bodies of some sailors killed at Pearl Harbor are finally being laid to rest. (Chris Zoeller/Globe-Gazette via AP, File)

  • FILE - In this July 7, 2018 file photo, U.S. Navy Rear Admiral John Krietz presents a folded American flag to Mark Arickx, nephew to Seaman First Class Leon Arickx, at Sacred Heart Cemetery in Osage, Iowa. Arickx’ remains, which were unidentifiable after his death after the attack at Pearl Harbor in 1941, were identified through DNA testing earlier this year. More than three-quarters of a century after the Japanese attack killed nearly 2,400 in Hawaii, the bodies of some sailors killed at Pearl Harbor are finally being laid to rest. (Chris Zoeller/Globe-Gazette via AP,File)

  • FILE - In this July 7, 2018 file photo, U.S. Navy sailors remove the casket with the remains of Seaman First Class Leon Arickx from a hearse at Sacred Heart Cemetery where they will be put to rest in Osage, Iowa. Arickx’ remains, which were unidentifiable after his death after the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor in 1941, were identified through DNA testing earlier this year. More than three-quarters of a century after the devastating attack killed nearly 2,400 in Hawaii, the bodies of some sailors killed at Pearl Harbor are finally being laid to rest. (Chris Zoeller/Globe-Gazette via AP, File)

  • In this undated photo released by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is Navy Seaman 1st Class William G. Bruesewitz. More than 75 years after nearly 2,400 members of the U.S. military were killed in the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor some who died on Dec. 7, 1941, are finally being laid to rest in cemeteries across the U.S. Bruesewitz, of Appleton, Wis., was killed on the USS Oklahoma and will be buried Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, in Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency via AP)

  • In this undated photo released by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency is Navy Aviation Machinist’s Mate 2nd Class Durell Wade. More than 75 years after nearly 2,400 members of the U.S. military were killed in the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor some who died on Dec. 7, 1941, are finally being laid to rest in cemeteries across the U.S. Due to scheduling conflicts at the Mississippi Veterans Memorial Cemetery, his family decided Friday, Dec. 7, 2018, the 77th anniversary of the Japanese attack would be appropriate for his burial in his home state, even though people might have to take time off from work to attend, said his nephew, Dr. Lawrence Wade. (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency via AP)

  • FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2012, file photo, the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu displays a gravestone identifying it as the resting place of seven unknown people from the USS Oklahoma who died in Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. More than 75 years after nearly 2,400 members of the U.S. military were killed in the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor some who died on Dec. 7, 1941, are finally being laid to rest in cemeteries across the United States. After DNA allowed the men to be identified and returned home, their remains are being buried in places such as Traer, Iowa and Ontonagon, Michigan. (AP Photo/Audrey McAvoy, File)

HONOLULU — More than 75 years after nearly 2,400 members of the U.S. military were killed in the Japanese attack at Pearl Harbor, some who died on Dec. 7, 1941, are finally being laid to rest in cemeteries across the United States.

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