Border patrol: More families cross illegally into San Diego

  • Migrants are escorted by a U.S. Border Patrol agent as they are detained after climbing over the border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, to San Ysidro, Calif., Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the U.S. but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

  • A woman climbs the U.S. border wall, planning to surrender to border guards as she crosses from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the United States but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
  • A man lowers a boy down from the U.S. border wall, as migrants planning to surrender to U.S. border guards cross over from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the U.S. but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

  • Central American migrants planning to surrender to U.S. border guards climb over the U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, late Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants who traveled with recent caravans want to seek asylum in the U.S. but face a decision between crossing illegally or waiting months, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of those cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

  • Three-year-old Honduran migrant Charlot Andrea looks back toward her grandmother and step-grandfather in Mexico from atop a rise in San Ysidro, California after she and her mother Rachel Rivera, 19, holding her hand, crossed under the U.S. border wall through a hole, as they plan to surrender to the U.S. border patrol and request asylum, seen from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018. Weeping as she stayed behind in Tijuana with her Mexican husband, the little girl’s grandmother Yesenia said her daughter and granddaughter joined the migrant caravan to flee an abusive husband back in Honduras. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

  • Honduran migrant Charlot Andrea, 3, is passed under the U.S. border wall to her 19-year-old mother Rachel Rivera, who had already crossed, in order to surrender to the U.S. border patrol and request asylum, from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018. Weeping as she stayed behind in Tijuana with her Mexican husband, the little girl’s grandmother Yesenia said her daughter and granddaughter joined the migrant caravan to flee an abusive husband back in Honduras. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

TIJUANA, Mexico — The woman crawled under first, squeezing face down through a gap dug under the border fence. The space is only a few inches high, and her feet kicked dust into the air as she wiggled. Next was her 3-year-old daughter, dressed in a pink sweat suit, pushed through to the California side on her back and feet first by a man who stayed in Mexico.

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