Thousands of anonymous bodies of migrants found in SAfrica

  • In this Sunday, Jan. 28, 2018 photo, a man killed in a mob justice incident in Johannesbrug is carried away to be transported to a mortuary. Of the 3,000 bodies that come into the Johannesburg mortuary each year, approximately ten percent remain unidentified. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)
  • Zimbabwean migrant Kholakele carries her 6-month old baby in her apartment in Johannesburg, South Africa on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018. Kholakele and her husband, Arnold, left, who entered the country illegally three years ago to find work, have heard stories about missing migrants through friends and relatives. They fear for their five children. “If one of them stays away for longer than 10 minutes, we phone them,” says Kholakele. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

  • This Friday, April 6, 2018 aerial photo shows Johannesburg’s downtown. Millions of migrants jostle for work in the thriving underground economy of Gauteng province, whose name roughly translates to “land of gold.” Thousands of them die without identities or simply disappear during the journey. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

    This Friday, April 6, 2018 aerial photo shows Johannesburg’s downtown. Millions of migrants jostle for work in the thriving underground economy of Gauteng province, whose name roughly translates to “land of gold.” Thousands of them die without identities or simply disappear during the journey. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

  • In this Friday, Aug. 24, 2018 photo, Zimbabwean migrant Banele Nkomo holds a photograph of her missing brother, Francis. She doesn’t know what happened to him and hasn’t heard from him for years. She says she misses him every day and wants to know whether he passed away and where his body is in order to find closure. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

  • This Monday Oct. 1, 2018 photo shows the skull of an unidentified adult male found in 2017, brought to a Johannesburg mortuary for identification purposes. Once a demographic profile is estimated, it will go to the victim identification center in the South African police department to create a facial reconstruction. (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

JOHANNESBURG — Ever since Francis Nkomo went missing 10 years ago, his older sister Banele has been waiting for a sign of life. “I miss him,” says Banele while holding his picture, all she has left of her brother. “I miss him a lot.”

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