After Florence, North Carolina political unity to be tested

  • In this Sept. 17, 2018 photo, Craven County Emergency Services Director Stanley Kite, center, discusses flooding and damage caused by Hurricane Florence with North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper, left, and Republican state House Speaker Tim Moore, right, in New Bern, N.C. Cooper has been praised by man, including Republicans, for his handling of the state’s immediate response to Florence. (AP Photo/Gary D. Robertson)

  • In this Sept. 12, 2018 photo, North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper meets members of FEMA, Search and Rescue Teams and officials at the Global TransPark in Kinston, N.C., ahead of Hurricane Florence. Cooper has been praised by man, including Republicans, for his handling of the state’s immediate response to Florence.(Janet S. Carter/Daily Free Press via AP)

RALEIGH, N.C. — As Hurricane Florence was thrashing North Carolina earlier this month, Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper’s leadership amid the devastation won widespread praise, including some from Republican politicians who have been passing laws to undercut him ever since he was elected.

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