Gala set to continue Gannenmono celebrations

  • Dennis Fujimoto / TGIF file photo

    Norman Hashisaka, a WWII Military Intelligence Service veteran, watches as Mabel Hashisaka greets U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono following the senator’s town hall meeting at the Chiefess Kamakahelei Middle School cafeteria in Puhi in this file photo.

  • Contributed photo

    Japanese singing sensation Torao Hikariyama (AKA Tevita Apina), performs at an earlier Kauai Matsuri Festival gathering at the Kauai War Memorial Convention Hall in Lihue.

  • Contributed image

    The Gannenmono sailed from Japan to the Kingdom of Hawaii aboard the Scioto (above). Leaving Yokohama on May 17, 1868, and arriving in Honolulu about a month later, on June 19, there were approximately 150 of them in all, including six women and a child.

  • Contributed photo

    Japan’s Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko greet members of the Hawaii Meiji Kai and United Japanese Society of Hawaii who were at Makiki Cemetery in this June 2018 photo. The royalty visited the cemetery to pay respects and lay wreaths at the Gannenmono Monument and the Kanyaku Imin Monument. Princess Kiko reached out and patted the shoulder of 1-year-old Hironori Tsujihara, who was in the arms of his mother, Yoshiko.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / TGIF file photo

    Volunteers from the Kauai Bonsai Club and Kauai Japanese Cultural Society join Art Umezu, the Kauai liaison for Hawaii Gannenmono, in taking a break during a passing shower at the Isenberg Japanese Garden at Lihue Civic Center that got a cleanup in advance of Gannenmono, the celebration marking the 150th anniversary of the first Japanese immigrants to Hawaii.

Gannenmono, or the 150th anniversary of the first Japanese immigrants to arrive in Hawaii, celebrations feature a trio of events for Kauai’s people to enjoy on Sept. 21 and 22.

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