Kushner tenants: We were pushed out for luxury condo buyers

  • In this June 28, 2018 photo, Sabine Anton poses for a photo on the balcony of her apartment in the building overlooking lower Manhattan and the Williamsburg bridge at 184 Kent Avenue in the Brooklyn borough of New York. An Associated Press investigation into one of the Kushner Cos.’ largest residential buildings in New York City reveals what some residents say was a campaign that used noisy construction to push rent-stabilized tenants out and bring high-paying condo buyers in. More than a dozen tenants told the AP that they were subjected to relentless banging, drilling, dust and rats.(AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • Barth Bazyluk looks through the mail at his home on July 5, 2018, in West Harrison, N.Y. Bazyluk moved to West Harrison with his family after leaving a rent-stabilized apartment they had lived in for seven years in Brooklyn after the building was bought by the Kushner Cos. An Associated Press investigation into one of the Kushner Cos.’ largest residential buildings in New York City reveals what some residents say was a campaign that used noisy construction to push rent-stabilized tenants out and bring high-paying condo buyers in. More than a dozen tenants told the AP that they were subjected to relentless banging, drilling, dust and rats. “They won, they succeeded,” says Bazyluk, who left apartment C606 with his wife and baby daughter in December. “You have to be ignorant or dumb to think this wasn’t deliberate.” (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

  • This June 28, 2018 photo shows 184 Kent Avenue in the Brooklyn borough of New York owned by the Kushner Cos. An Associated Press investigation into one of the Kushner Cos.’ largest residential buildings in New York City reveals what some residents say was a campaign that used noisy construction to push rent-stabilized tenants out and bring high-paying condo buyers in. More than a dozen tenants told the AP that they were subjected to relentless banging, drilling, dust and rats. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

NEW YORK — The hammering and drilling began just months after Jared Kushner’s family real estate firm bought a converted warehouse apartment building in the hip, Williamsburg section of Brooklyn.

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