Mexico elections center on disgust with corruption, violence

  • Presidential candidate Ricardo Anaya, of the PAN party, flashes a victory sign as he drives away from a polling station after voting in general elections in Queretaro, Mexico, Sunday, July 1, 2018. Sunday’s elections for posts at every level of government are Mexico’s largest ever and have become a referendum on corruption, graft and other tricks used to divert taxpayer money to officials’ pockets and empty those of the country’s poor. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)

  • A man casts his vote during general elections in Xochimilco, Mexico City, Sunday, July 1, 2018. Mexico’s more than 89 million voters head to the polls Sunday to elect a president, who serves one six-year term, as well as 500 congressional deputies and 128 senators. (AP Photo/ Emilio Espejel)

  • Presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, of the MORENA party, is surrounded by the press after casting his vote during general elections in Mexico City, Sunday, July 1, 2018. Sunday’s elections for posts at every level of government are Mexico’s largest ever and have become a referendum on corruption, graft and other tricks used to divert taxpayer money to officials’ pockets and empty those of the country’s poor. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)

  • Voters wait in line outside a polling station during general elections in Mexico City, Sunday, July 1, 2018. Sunday’s elections for posts at every level of government are Mexico’s largest ever and have become a referendum on corruption, graft and other tricks used to divert taxpayer money to officials’ pockets and empty those of the country’s poor. (AP Photo/Anthony Vazquez)

MEXICO CITY — Mexicans were voting Sunday in a potentially transformative election that could put in power a firebrand vowing to end politics and business as usual in a country weary of spiraling violence and scandal-plagued politicians.

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