Breaking News

Breaking News

Twin brothers reunited 74 years after WWII death at Normandy

  • In this photo taken on Friday, June 15, 2018, school children walk by the grave of 13 men from the Navy ship LST-523 who were never identified by name and are now buried at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Neupre, Belgium on Friday, June 15, 2018. For decades, he had a number for a name, Unknown X-9352, at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred. On Tuesday, June 19, 2018, Julius Pieper will be reunited with his twin brother in Normandy, where the two Navy men died together when their ship shattered on an underwater mine while trying to reach the blood-soaked D-Day beaches. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
  • In this undated photo, provided by family member Susan Lawrence on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, the Pieper children, from left, MaryAnn, Leona, Ivona, twins Ludwig and Julius and Fred stand outside the family home in Nebraska. For decades, he had a number for a name, Unknown X-9352, at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred. On Tuesday, June 19, 2018, Julius Pieper will be reunited with his twin brother in Normandy, where the two Navy men died together when their ship shattered on an underwater mine while trying to reach the blood-soaked D-Day beaches. (Susan Lawrence via AP)
  • In this undated photo, provided by family member Susan Lawrence on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, Julius Pieper in his U.S. Navy uniform. For decades, he had a number for a name, Unknown X-9352, at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred. On Tuesday, June 19, 2018, Julius Pieper will be reunited with his twin brother Ludwig in Normandy, where the two Navy men died together when their ship shattered on an underwater mine while trying to reach the blood-soaked D-Day beaches. (Susan Lawrence via AP)
  • In this photo taken on Friday, June 15, 2018, Assistant Superintendent Vincent Joris talks by the original grave of Navy sailor Julius Pieper, at the Ardennes American Cemetery in Liege, Belgium on Friday, June 15, 2018. For decades, he had a number for a name, Unknown X-9352, at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred. On Tuesday, June 19, 2018, Julius Pieper will be reunited with his twin brother Ludwig in Normandy, where the two Navy men died together when their ship shattered on an underwater mine while trying to reach the blood-soaked D-Day beaches. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
  • In this undated photo, provided on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by family member Susan Lawrence, Ludwig Pieper in his U.S. Navy uniform. For decades, he had a number for a name, Unknown X-9352, at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred. On Tuesday, June 19, 2018, Julius Pieper will be reunited with his twin brother Ludwig in Normandy, where the two Navy men died together when their ship shattered on an underwater mine while trying to reach the blood-soaked D-Day beaches. (Susan Lawrence via AP)
  • In this undated photo, provided by family member Susan Lawrence on Wednesday, June 13, 2018, twin brothers Julius Pieper, left, and Ludwig Pieper in their U.S. Navy uniforms. For decades, he had a number for a name, Unknown X-9352, at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred. On Tuesday, June 19, 2018, Julius Pieper will be reunited with his twin brother in Normandy, where the two Navy men died together when their ship shattered on an underwater mine while trying to reach the blood-soaked D-Day beaches. (Susan Lawrence via AP)

COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France — For decades, he was known only as Unknown X-9352 at a World War II American cemetery in Belgium where he was interred.

0 Comments