Pearl Harbor survivor says goodbye upon leaving Hawaii

  • Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory, center, receives a presentation MIA/POW flag during a ceremony honoring him, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

  • Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory, left, signs a Pearl Harbor themed toy box for US Navy Commander Master Chief Jaye Bell, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

  • Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory, center, sits a surprise ceremony honoring him, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

  • Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory speaks at a ceremony honoring him, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

  • Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory speaks to guest at a surprise ceremony honoring him, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

  • Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory, center, arrives a surprise ceremony honoring him, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii — Hundreds of sailors lined ship decks and piers on Tuesday as a Pearl Harbor attack survivor who doggedly pushed the federal bureaucracy to identify the remains of fellow servicemen killed in the bombing visited the storied naval base to say what could be his final goodbyes.

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