Lava flow stops after covering 2 wells at geothermal plant

  • This May 23, 2018, Satellite photo provided by DigitalGlobe shows lava coming out of fissures caused by Kilauea volcano, near Puna Geothermal Venture, a geothermal energy plant, in Pahoa, Hawaii. Wendy Stovall, a scientists with the U.S. Geological Stovall said lava spatter from one of the vents was forming a wall that was helping protect the geothermal plant. (Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company via AP)

  • In a Saturday, May 26, 2018 photo, area residents, the media and national guard flock to what is now the end of Leilani Avenue to take in the fiery show at fissures 2, 7 and 8 of the Kilauea volcano near Pahoa. (George F. Lee/The Honolulu Advertiser via AP)

  • In this Saturday, May 26, 2018 image from video released by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava sends up clouds of steam and toxic gases as it enters the Pacific Ocean as Kilauea Volcano continues its eruption cycle near Pahoa on the island of Kilauea, Hawaii. Lava from the Kilauea volcano has reached a geothermal power plant on the Big Island, approaching wells that have been capped to protect against the release of toxic gas should they mix with lava. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)

  • In this Saturday, May 26, 2018, image released by the U.S. Geological Survey HVO shows an aerial view of fissure 22 looking toward the south, as Kilauea Volcano continues its eruption cycle near Pahoa on the island of Kilauea, Hawaii. Lava from the Kilauea volcano has reached a geothermal power plant on the Big Island, approaching wells that have been capped to protect against the release of toxic gas should they mix with lava. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)

HONOLULU — Lava from the Kilauea volcano oozed over two wells at a geothermal power plant on Hawaii’s Big Island, but county officials say the flow has stopped.

Officials say there was no release of any dangerous hydrogen sulfide gas after lava crept over the plugged wells Sunday.

Some feared a breach if lava penetrated the well shafts that tap steam and hot water to make electricity. Both wells were closed and secured in anticipation of the lava flow.

The plant, Puna Geothermal, lies on the southeast flank of the volcano, nestled between residential neighborhoods. It was shut down shortly after Kilauea began spewing lava May 3.

Officials earlier this month removed 50,000 gallons (189,265 liters) of a flammable gas called pentane from the plant to reduce the chance of explosions.

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