Tribute to a prince

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Malie Jumawan pounds a water-soaked piece of mulberry bark into kapa Friday during cultural presentations and demonstrations that followed the opening protocol for the Prince Kuhio commemorations at the Seaview Terrace at the Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa in Poipu.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Keola Kahalekomo, the great-grandson of Janet Kahalekomo of Hanapepe, adjusts the kalo he pounds it into poi Friday during cultural presentations and demonstrations that followed the opening protocol for the Prince Kuhio commemorations at the Seaview Terrace at the Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa in Poipu.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Chelise Kahalekomo, a third generation member of Janet Kahalekomo’s ohana, right, discuss salt-making with Ku‘uipo Kumukahi, cultural practitioner at the Grand Hyatt Waikiki, Friday during the cultural presentations and demonstrations that followed the opening protocol of the Prince Kuhio commemorations at the Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa in Poipu.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa cultural practitioner Sandi Quinsaat, right, greets a member of the resort’s leadership team as Ku‘uipo Kumukahi, cultural practitioner from the Grand Hyatt Waikiki, background, presents her lei ho‘okupu Friday during the opening of Prince Kuhio commemorations at the Seaview Terrace of the Poipu property.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa General Manager Dan King and cultural practitioner Sandi Quinsaat drape the portrait of Prince Kuhio with a maile lei ho‘okupu Friday during the opening of Prince Kuhio commemorations at the Poipu property.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    The pahu, being sounded by Kolo, captures the attention of the audience as the Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort & Spa leadership team, led by cultural practitioner Sandi Quinsaat and General Manager Dan King, prepares for the ho‘okupu presentations Friday at the hotel’s Seaview Terrace during Prince Kuhio festivities.

POIPU — Prince Kuhio commemorations continue through the weekend, including the annual commemoration service hosted by the Royal Order of Kamehameha, Chapter No. 3 Kaumuali‘i, starting at 10 this morning at the Prince Kuhio Park.

The opening protocol of a three-day celebration at the Grand Hyatt Kauai Resort and Spa, Prince Kuhio Day is a state holiday celebrating the birth of Jonah Kuhio Kalaniana‘ole Pi‘ikoi on March 26 at Hoai, Kualu in the Koloa District of Kauai in 1871.

“Aunty Stella Burgess, the late cultural practitioner at the Grand Hyatt Kauai, would be real proud of him,” said Diann Hartman of the Grand Hyatt Kauai. “Kolo — he’s a bartender, here — has matured and progressed into a great person.”

Kolo sounded the pahu that announced the Grand Hyatt Kauai leadership team led by cultural practitioner Sandi Quinsaat and General Manager Dan King, who opened the three-day commemoration with the opening protocol where lei ho‘okupu was presented by the leadership team and members of the audience, including the Kahalekomo ohana, Ku‘uipo Kumukahi, the cultural practitioner at the Grand Hyatt Waikiki, and Kekai Kapu.

“We have three generations of the Janet Kahalekomo ohana, here today,” said Brandee Kahalekomo. “If my parents were here, there would be four generations, starting with Aunty Janet.”

The Kahalekomo ohana were part of the cultural presentations and demonstrations that followed the opening protocol, the ‘ohana presenting salt making, coconut frond weaving, kalo, and more.

“You have to bring them when they’re young so they learn,” said Aunty Janet, a member of a Hawaiian civic club, the first one being started by Prince Kuhio as part of his efforts at preserving the Hawaiian people and its culture. “Brandee and Chelsie started coming to the Prince Kuhio ceremony at the park when they were the size of my great grandchildren. They need to know because one day, I’m not going to be able to do this. They need to know what to do so they can follow.”

Malie Jumawan, working the kapa making table, said she, too was a product of learning by doing.

“Sabra Kauka started this kapa-making demonstration,” Jumawan said. “But now, she can’t do it so I’m here. This piece I’m working on, it’s not the same as Sabra would’ve wanted, it’s not the same color. But the piece had naturally occuring brown in it, and instead of throwing it away, I wanted to see how it would come out.”

Visitors streamed through the corridors filled with cultural demonstrations and crafters.

“This is the rainy time,” said Chelise Kahalekomo. “The salt pans fill with water and we pretty much stay indoors to make baskets and ready the tools for the next harvest. When the rains leave, the water dries and we go out to harvest.”

More celebration events continue at the Grand Hyatt Kauai where a silent auction table helped raise funds for the annual Visitor Industry Charity Walk coming up on May 12 at the North Vidinha soccer fields.

Tonight, following the Royal Order of Kamehameha service, the Grand Hyatt Kauai performs a torch-lighting ceremony and hula presentations paying tribute to the “Prince of the People” at the Seaview Terrace starting from 5 p.m.

Sunday opens with a performance from the Tsunami Taiko ensemble starting at 10 a.m. to herald the start of the craft fair which continues to 3 p.m.

Monday, the Prince’s birthday, will have the Marriott’s Waiohai Beach Club hosting its Prince Kuhio program starting at 10 a.m.

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Dennis Fujimoto, staff writer and photographer, can be reached at 245-0453 or dfujimoto@thegardenisland.com.

4 Comments
  1. harry oyama March 24, 2018 2:17 am Reply

    Historical records show that such “Royal Order of Kamehameha” is not needed for Kauai’s King Kaumuali’i, since he was never defeated and held a royality rank much higher than Kamehameha, which is Wohi, or the right to walk behind other Ali’i.


  2. Thad Allen Miller March 24, 2018 6:25 am Reply

    My son is the prince .You people are so BAD.OMEGA


  3. Jake Liggett March 24, 2018 7:01 am Reply

    I saw a rear window decal yesterday on a local driver’s SUV that read “My heroes killed Captain Cook.” Hey, “Respek da Lokalz,” right?


  4. No_They_Didn't March 24, 2018 8:26 am Reply

    This was after the over throw of queen liliuokalani and death of king David Kalakaua in 1891. The provincial government just either stopped or this annexation and USA was an extension of that government and the way it was in 1893. Things have changed though. A whole new constitution was brought in to Hawai’i. Were the electors in 1902 any good? Curious.


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