Bolivians demand sea outlet

  • Aymaras hold a portion of the Bolivian naval flag on the highway between Oruro and La Paz Bolivia, Saturday, March 10, 2018. A narrow strip of blue stretched for more than 150 miles (nearly 200 kilometers) across the nation Saturday, as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war in the late 1800’s and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

  • People attend a ceremony for the laying of a giant blue flag representing the Bolivian naval ensign on the highway between Oruro to La Paz, Bolivia, Saturday, March 10, 2018. A narrow strip of blue stretched for more than 150 miles (nearly 200 kilometers) across the nation Saturday, as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war in the late 1800’s and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

  • Bolivians hold a portion of their naval flag on the highway between Oruro and La Paz Bolivia, Saturday, March 10, 2018. A narrow strip of blue stretched for more than 150 miles (nearly 200 kilometers) across the nation Saturday, as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war in the late 1800’s and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

  • A woman sews together portions of a giant blue flag on the highway between Oruro and La Paz Bolivia, Saturday, March 10, 2018. A narrow strip of blue stretched for more than 150 miles (nearly 200 kilometers) across the nation Saturday, as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war in the late 1800’s and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

  • Aymaras stand alongside a portion of a giant Bolivian Naval flag on the highway between Oruro and La Paz Bolivia, Saturday, March 10, 2018. A narrow strip of blue stretched for more than 150 miles (nearly 200 kilometers) across the nation Saturday, as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war in the late 1800’s and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

  • People wave a portion of a giant Bolivian Naval flag on the highway between Oruro and La Paz Bolivia, Saturday, March 10, 2018. A narrow strip of blue stretched for more than 150 miles (nearly 200 kilometers) across the nation Saturday, as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea. Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war in the late 1800’s and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

LA PAZ, Bolivia — A narrow strip of blue has stretched for more than 120 miles (196 kilometers) across the nation of Bolivia as part of a demonstration of the country’s demand for an outlet to the sea.

Bolivian officials say the Bolivian Navy ensign held by participants along a highway on Saturday is the world’s biggest — or at least longest flag. The navy ensign is mostly blue, but includes the country’s red, yellow and green flag.

Thousands of people heeded President Evo Morales’ summons to take part in the demonstration.

Bolivia lost its only seacoast to Chile in a war from 1879 to 1883. It’s been demanding some sort of sea outlet for generations and has asked the World Court to order Chile to negotiate a settlement in good faith.

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, send us an email.