Bikes everywhere! Dockless bikes up access, sometimes chaos

  • In this Feb. 13, 2018 photo, two dockless LimeBike’s share the sidewalk with others from Washington, D.C.’s docked share program called Capital Bikeshare in Washington. Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise. But the dockless bikes are also producing some chaos with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes. Over the last year, startup companies have brought the bikes that don’t require docking stations into city after city in the U.S. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

  • In this photo taken Feb. 22, 2018, two "dockless" bicycles bookend a pair of tents where people are camped on a sidewalk in Seattle. Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise, but they are also producing some chaos with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes. Over the last year, startup companies have brought the bikes that can be unlocked with an app and don't require docking stations into city after city in the U.S. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
  • In this Feb. 22, 2018 photo, a pedestrian walks past a pair of “dockless” bicycles parked next to a sidewalk in Seattle. Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise, but they are also producing some chaos with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes. Over the last year, startup companies have brought the bikes that can be unlocked with an app and don’t require docking stations into city after city in the U.S. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

  • In this Feb. 28, 2018 photo, a shared bike lays by a sidewalk along a busy thoroughfare in Dallas. Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise. But the dockless bikes are also producing some chaos with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes. Over the last year, startup companies have brought the bikes that don’t require docking stations into city after city in the U.S. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

  • In this Feb. 8, 2018 photo, shared bikes ready to be used are lined up on a sidewalk by a popular tourist destination in Dallas. Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise. But the dockless bikes are also producing some chaos with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes. Over the last year, startup companies have brought the bikes that don’t require docking stations into city after city in the U.S. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

DALLAS — Shared bikes that can be left wherever the rider ends up are helping more people get access to the mode of transportation that reduces car traffic and increases exercise. But the dockless bikes are also producing some chaos, with discarded bikes cluttering public spaces, blocking sidewalks and even placed in trees and lakes.

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