On earthquake anniversary, Haitians trying to rebuild

  • In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a woman sells goat meat in what has become the marketplace in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Camp residents dream of one day returning to the modern comforts that were taken from them when a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • In this Friday, Jan. 5, 2018 photo, a rooster stands in the middle of a construction site for a concrete home, in the Caradeux tent camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The United States granted Temporary Protected Status to Haitian immigrants after the disaster, a status the Trump administration is revoking after deciding that conditions in Haiti had improved enough to merit removal of the special protection. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, street vendor Charler Dieufer, 37, plays his guitar while standing in front of his tent at the Caradeux refugee camp, set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Caradeux was meant to be a temporary home to 20,000 displaced people but has morphed into a crowded shantytown, the majority of them still living in tents. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • This Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 photo shows clothes drying on rebar at the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. For many, the 8th anniversary of the Jan. 12, 2010 quake was made more painful by President Donald Trump’s reported remarks questioning why the U.S. would accept more people from Haiti and “shithole countries” in Africa rather than places like Norway. Trump denied using that language. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 photo, Mona Leger, a 39-year-old charcoal vendor and mother of 6 stands outside her tent as she hands out labapen, or breadfruit in Creole, to her children, in the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Leger arrived at the camp in 2010, pregnant with her second child, her husband and their 4-year-old son. Leger, who earns a meager living selling charcoal, dares to dream the impossible, to one day afford to build a permanent home made of concrete. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

  • In this Sunday, Jan. 7, 2018 photo, a bullhorn preacher evangelizes to the passing residents of the Caradeux refugee camp set up nearly eight years ago for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Just before 5 p.m. on Jan. 12, 2010 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake upended life in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. For many of those left homeless, life hasn’t yet returned to normal. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Eight years ago, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake upended life in Haiti, killing more than 300,000 people by some estimates and destroying hundreds of thousands of homes. For many of those left homeless, life hasn’t yet returned to normal.

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