Honoring sovereigns

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    The All Saints’ choir performs at the Feast of Holy Sovereigns in front of the space where the pipe organ being constructed in California will eventually find its home, the space being indicated by a banner showing a rendition of the organ. The organ is expected to be installed in 2018.

  • Dennis Fujimoto/The Garden Island

    Acolyte Braden Tabura leads the recessional from the Feast of Our Holy Sovereigns Sunday at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Kapaa.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Ita Rubio performs a hula as the All Saints’ choir perform the offertory anthem with lyrics by Chucky Boy Chock and arranged by Henry Adams Curtis Sunday during the Feast of Our Holy Sovereigns at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Kapaa.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Members of Hale O Na Ali‘i, a benevolent Hawaiian society, receive communion from the Rev. Ryan Newman Sunday during the Feast of Our Holy Sovereigns at All Saints’ Episcopal Church in Kapaa.

  • Dennis Fujimoto / The Garden Island

    Ita Rubio performs a hula to Ku‘u Lei Hiwahiwa, a post-communion anthem composed by Chucky Boy Chock and arranged by Henry Adams Curtis, Sunday as the Rev. Ryan Newman of the All Saints’ Episcopal Church prepares for the recessional of the Feast of Our Holy Sovereigns Sunday in Kapaa.

KAPAA — The Feast of Our Holy Sovereigns traditionally takes place during the Emmalani Festival, which remembers Queen Emma’s visit to Kauai in 1871.

“The sanctuary was being worked on during that time in October,” the Rev. Ryan Newman of the All Saints’ Episcopal Church said Sunday.

“We just opened the sanctuary last week, and decided this was the time to hold the Feast of Our Holy Sovereigns. We were going to do the service in the All Saints’ Gym, but we decided to wait.”

An overflow audience, with members of the Hawaiian benevolent societies — including the Royal Order of Kamehameha I, ‘Ahahui Ka‘ahumanu, Hale O Na Ali‘i, and the Daughters of Hawaii — filled the Kapaa church.

The service paid tribute to Queen Emma and King Kamehameha IV, both individuals “living beyond their baptism,” Newman said.

“We still have the pipe organ to install,” said Wayne Doliente, a church member. “The organ is being constructed in California, and should be installed in 2018.”

Queen Emma and King Kamehameha IV invited the Church of England to visit Hawaii, and the Episcopal Church in Hawaii was chartered in 1862 under the laws of the Kingdom of Hawaii.

The king and queen supported the church’s presence throughout the Hawaiian Islands with gifts of land, including the land on which All Saints’ Church calls home.

“We were really lucky because we got two plants from the spider lily collection at the queen’s summer palace on Oahu,” said Pam Chock of the Daughters of Hawaii. “One will go into the church’s garden, and I get to add the second one to my collection at home.”

As a church of the Episcopal Diocese of Hawaii, All Saints’ is a member of the worldwide Anglican Communion that joins together more than 70 million members in 163 countries. The All Saints’ church was founded as Kauai’s first mission of the Episcopal Church in 1924 at Kealia. It moved to its present location in 1925.

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