Letters for June 3, 2015

Letters for June 3, 2015

Crash investigations taking too long

Skills are needed for our Kauai police.

One hour is all that is needed to photograph all aspects of motor accidents, note debris and skid marks on the road and paint key factors (on the blacktop) related to the accident, before moving the vehicles.

This would provide a complete investigation leading to driver/witness interviews in order to determine the cause(s).

Let’s get them trained!

Denis Orme

Kapaa

Students enjoyed ‘Newspaper in Education’

Dear Garden Island Circulation Department:

Waimea Canyon Middle School thanks you for the opportunity to participate in the “Newspapers in Education” program this past school year. This was the first time in a very long time that our school offered news writing as an elective to our sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students.

Having a daily newspaper available was the perfect teaching resource. The students have become very familiar with newspaper layouts, the different kinds of articles in newspaper and issues in journalism that they were able to learn about and experience using The Garden Island.

Most of the students are very tech savvy and in the future will probably get the news on their smart phones or computers but having a printed newspaper to work with provided foundational understandings. It kept everyone up to date with current events and also provided the unique local news stories happening on Kauai. We were so fortunate to have the NIE program. Thank you very much for the 27 subscriptions we received all year!

Cinthy Kagawa

Waimea Canyon Middle School

News writing teacher

When it comes to faith, to each his own

I happen to be a member of the West Kauai United Methodist Church. I have also been affiliated with the Interfaith Council, a group consisting of representatives from different faiths which pursue their faith journeys here on the island of Kauai. I have found it to be a personally rewarding and enriching experience to be among a multi-dimensional setting where there is respect for one another in being in the midst of those who are Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, Christian, Muslim, and even agnostic or atheist, as the case may be.

It is the right of each individual to determine a pathway of spiritual dimensions as one sees fit to do so. “To each his own,” folks!

Can we not use our time to be mindful of the freedom of choice we would like for ourselves and for others, as well?

The one precautionary measure we all need to observe and remember is to not let fanaticism warp the devotion one has in becoming “better-than-thou-art” in comparing one’s belief system with respect to what others are doing!

Let’s keep the essence of “aloha” alive and well in our minds and hearts and in our thoughts and actions.

Jose Bulatao, Jr.,

Kekaha

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