General Election Tuesday, Nov. 4

• Polling place locator:

   www4.honolulu.gov/vote/

• Properly registered voters in the state of Hawai‘i will receive a Notice of Voter Registration and Address Confirmation (NVRAC) postcard prior to the election. The NVRAC lists which election(s) a voter is eligible for, the voter’s district/precinct number and polling place location.

• Questions regarding voter registration status or polling place location should be directed to the Kaua‘i County Clerk: 241-6350.

• Polling places open at 7 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. To avoid long lines at the polls, vote during non-peak hours:

— In the morning, between 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.

— In the afternoon, between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.

• Hawai‘i law provides that you may be allowed two hours of time away from work to vote.

• Voters requiring special assistance at the polling place on Election Day should speak to the Voter Assistance Official at their polling place.

Kaua‘i County elections are nonpartisan elections 

Voters in the 1996 General Election approved an amendment to the Charter of the County of Kaua‘i which established non-partisan elections to the offices of mayor, County Council, and prosecuting  attorney. In non-partisan elections, candidates appear on the ballot without a political party designation. If they desire, candidates may conduct their campaigns in a partisan manner (i.e. include party affiliation on printed literature, TV or radio ads, etc.).   

County elective offices:

• Mayor — The mayor serves as the chief executive officer of the county, exercising direct supervision over all county departments and coordinating all administrative activities. The mayor serves a four-year term, which begins at 12 o’clock meridian on the first working day in December following election, and is limited to two consecutive 4-year terms. The 2008 mayoral election, though, is to fill the term left open by the late-Mayor Bryan Baptiste’s death. The remaining term is two years. Prospective candidates for mayor must be at least 30 years of age and be a resident elector of Kaua‘i County for at least three years immediately prior to election.

• County Council — The legislative power of the county is vested in and exercised by the County Council, which is composed of seven members who are elected at-large (i.e. each councilmember represents the entire island of Kaua‘i rather than only a specific district). Members of the County Council serve two-year terms, which begin at 12 o’clock meridian  on the first working day in December following election, and are limited to serving four consecutive two-year terms. Prospective candidates for council must be qualified voters of Kaua‘i County for at least two years immediately preceding election.

• Prosecuting Attorney — The prosecuting attorney serves as the head of the judicial branch of county government and serves a four-year term, which begins at 12 o’clock meridian on the first working day of December following election. There is no limit on the number of terms a prosecuting  attorney may serve. Prospective candidates for prosecuting attorney must be licensed to practice and in good standing before the Supreme Court of the State of Hawai‘i, practiced law in Hawai‘i for at least three years, and be a duly qualified elector of the County of Kaua‘i for a least one year immediately preceding election.   

Election to office 

The 1996 Charter Amendment ballot question, which established non-partisan county elections also amended the Kaua‘i County Charter to allow candidates to be elected in the Primary Election.

• Mayor — To be elected in the Primary Election, a candidate for mayor must receive a majority of  votes cast (i.e. 50% plus 1 vote) for that contest. If a candidate is elected in the Primary Election there will be no mayor’s race in the General Election. If no candidate for mayor receives a majority of votes cast in the Primary Election the names of the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes will be placed on the General Election ballot. At the General Election, the candidate receiving the highest number of votes shall be elected mayor.

• County Council — To be elected in the Primary Election, a candidate for County Council must receive 30 percent of all votes cast. If any council seat remains to be filled following the Primary Election, two candidates for each vacant council seat shall be placed on the ballot for the General  Election. The names of the candidates receiving the highest number of votes cast in the Primary Election, other than the name of the candidate(s) elected in the Primary Election shall be placed on the ballot until there are a sufficient number of candidates on the ballot as  provided above. At the General Election, the candidates receiving the highest number of votes for each  vacant council seat shall be elected. Note:  Because the County Council is elected at-large, each voter is eligible to vote for up to seven council candidates each election. Voters may vote for less than seven candidates. Voting for more than seven council candidates is referred to as overvoting and will void all votes cast for the council contest.

• Prosecuting Attorney — To be elected in the Primary Election, a candidate for prosecuting attorney must receive a majority of votes cast (i.e. 50% plus 1 vote) for that contest. If a candidate is elected in the Primary Election, there will be no prosecuting attorney’s race in the General Election. If no candidate for prosecuting attorney receives a majority of votes cast in the Primary Election, the names of the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes will be placed on the General Election ballot. At the General Election, the candidate receiving the highest number of votes shall be elected prosecuting attorney.

• The information provided is intended primarily as a reference source on elections for Kaua‘i County. The information is from the Hawaii Revised Statues and the Kaua‘i County Charter, and should not be used as the authority on Kaua‘i County elections. For additional information, review applicable sections of the Kaua‘i County Charter or phone the Office of the County Clerk, Elections Division at 241-6350. 

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