Letters for Monday June 18, 2007

• What we are losing

• County manager the answer?

• A more transparent council

• Simple solution

• A lot like herding cats


What we are losing

Progress lures controversy on whether development properly supports growth. Letters expressing pros/cons of building a bike/pedestrian right-of-way drew enough response to certify debate. This undertaking prompted various opinions on government’s policies.

Success or failure of this project depends on whether it meets its objectives. There is too little work done for reasonable judgment and validity of favorable or opposing opinions.

While the foregoing statement appears neutral, issues brought to the forum merit attention. Currently embroiled in discussion is the legality, where authorities permitted structures already in place.

Successful resolution hastens the process for continuance and viability of the project. Inaction only becomes a deterrent and focus for failure.

This project faces other obstacles. The only forthcoming assurance appears directed at heightened discussion on another topic as the right-of-way extends sections currently enjoyed by others.

Although many people prefer slow growth, we also recognize that need, where applicable. The following expresses my thoughts on matters important to me and understandably of little/no concern to others. Anticipate no rebuttal on arguments countering my viewpoint.

To planners (of this proposal), the Kealia Beach section to the 9 mile marker on Kuhio Highway is the only stretch of this highway exposing Kapa‘a’s coastline. Fortunately, another section fronting (former) Coco Palms resort portrays Wailua Bay. On sunny days and moonlit nights, we enjoyed this pristine scenery. To those who heard the phrase, “It made time stand still”; this view captured the moment. We enjoyed natural beauty at its best and forsake this eternal gift to progress.

The placement of pavilions ruined its impact as would a similar act do to the lookout into Kalalau Valley. There are a limited number of places where passersby can enjoy breathless scenery and hope these comments provide better planning decisions.

B. Kaneholani

Anahola


County manager the answer?

Walter Lewis, in his commentary “Where is the Charter Commission?” Forum, June 16, appears to be a strong supporter (and perhaps candidate) for the manager form of government on Kaua‘i. I have a problem with this as it places the cart before the horse.

I believe all land everywhere on earth is a creation of creative forces in the universe, not of humans who have forcibly assumed power over it and, consequently, land is a question to be decided by all inhabitants equally. This means all Kauaians are to be involved in the management of this island, including determining whether there shall be a “manager” who would be answerable directly to them.

Triaka-Don Smith

Lihu‘e


A more transparent council

The recent decision by the Kauai County Council on the so-called “Big Box” issue once again calls to question the wisdom and ethics of our esteemed council.

Public testimony spoke favorably toward defeating the measure and allowing Wal-Mart to expand its existing store. A survey was made public that indicated the people of Kaua‘i were decisively against the measure and providing Kaua‘i with an alternative for higher food prices and poor quality merchandise and produce. But that was not to be.

During the public discussion a councilmember stated that he had in his possession many letters in support of the measure. Apparently his vote was because of these letters. Alas, he did not follow the basic precepts of good government, namely by disclosing and making public those letters that by receipt to the council became part of the public record. All correspondence either sent to the members of the council or by members of the council are the property of the people and at all times subject to review by the public.

The question of whom we are to believe becomes a paramount issue. My comfort level would be raised if that councilmember made those letters public as he should. Let us see the letters. Just don’t make a statement that is pertinent to the issue and is not in public view.

This issue has become clouded by rhetoric, most true but some obscure. Unfortunately, the public has become accustomed to this sort of action by the council. When votes are taken and decisions are made based on facts and not by political pressures, this island will have taken a large step forward to achieving responsible and responsive government.

Monroe Richman

Koloa


Simple solution

In regards to conservation land use and Bill 2204 of Kaua‘i.

My advice to the Kaua‘i County Council is to try to find a way to get all of the people who own houses, condos and B&Bs on conservation land, off of that land.

Use Manifest Destiny or any other law for the state/federal government to take back the conservation land that these people have built their houses and B&Bs on, and use it for what it was designated and supposed to be used for … conservation.

Dennis Chaquette

Kapa‘a


A lot like herding cats

Regarding the Humane Society on this island, do like the other Humane Societies and euthanize unwanted cats. Stray cats urinate and spread feces, fleas and disease all over our beautiful island. When we catch them and take them to the Humane Society, they release them again in our communities and backyards in what are called “feral cat colonies.”

Basically this is where instead of humanely putting the cat down as they should, they put the cats back on the streets to be hit by cars, injured by other wild animals and ruin our island with their urine, fleas and waste. This cat problem on our island is ridiculous.  As a cat owner and cat lover I can tell you that they deserve a lot more than to be thrown back out on the streets, and we deserve alot more than urine, poop and fleas all over our island.

Bob Kanahele

Kekaha

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