Princeville is great

To the Forum: Attn: Bill and Mary Chase:

In your Editorial of April 2, you describe your dislike for Princeville as a

community and its Shopping Center as a viable shopping venue. You

state:

“We are just beginning our eighth year of living on Kaua’i, our

family of four. All of those years we have been on the Northshore, arguably one

of the most beautiful places on the planet, but ALSO A RATHER WEIRD SCENE,

COMMUNITY-WISE.”

( I’ve lived in Princeville for nine years and have never

found this to be anything other than a wonderful place called “home”.)

“We

spent our first five years in Princeville, A SLICE OF SUBURBIA THAT CAN’T

DECIDE IF IT’S A RESORT, A RETIREMENT COMMUNITY, OR A FAMILY

NEIGHBORHOOD”.

(Why you judge a community “a failure” when it is actually

able to be many things is my question).

“To us it never felt like a “real

community”—the kids are bused to Hanalei for school, THE SHOPPING CONSISTS OF

STORES THAT SELL T-SHIRTS AND $5 ICE CREAM CONES. . .”

(This statement

about viable shopping is absolutely not true!)

I find it odd that you don’t

make one “positive statement” about the community of Princeville. Princeville

is safe and clean! Princeville has large, open landscaped and well maintained

spaces with walking paths! Princeville has wonderful golf courses, views and a

new library! Princeville has it’s own water system, and following Iniki, was

one of the few communities on Kaua’i that almost immediately had water!

Princeville enforces its CC&R’s that keep our community beautiful. Not

everyone likes CC&R’s, so people moving here must accept these rules or

choose another community more acceptable to their lifestyle. The Princeville

Shopping Center caters to the Northshore community and its visitors. My

partner and I have spent nine years as retailers in the Princeville Center,

starting with one store and growing to three to meet the shopping needs of the

residents and visitors. If you had taken the time to check out the Shopping

Center you would have found our three stores SanDudes, Pretty Woman and Just

Add Water, as well as other fine merchants!

In SanDudes, we offer one of

the best selections of aloha and casual attire for men, and women on the

northshore along with gift items. We keep our prices competitive because our

goal is to be a “resident choice” for shopping. As a gift back to Kaua’i to

help preserve it for future generations, we donate a portion of our sales to

agencies working with our endangered sea life. Since it appears that you have

never been in SanDudes—shame on you for making such an uneducated evaluation

of what we have to offer!

In 1995 we opened Pretty Woman, with a commitment

to meeting ladies “complete” shopping needs. Pretty Woman stocked items

from—lingerie to wedding gowns. Besides Liberty House, we were the ONLY

complete ladies store on Kaua’i. We drew people from Po’ipu, Kekaha and even

from the neighbor islands. I suspect that even your wife may have shopped at

Pretty Woman. Unfortunately, this store closed in March as this building

undertakes remodeling for the new Princeville Post Office. To fill this void,

we opened “Just Add Water” in the front of the center which offers a quality

selection of washable casual attire, beach wear, accessories and

gifts.

You further state: “During this time (five years in Princeville),

we identified most with the Hanalei community, as our kids went to school there

and the Hanalei Community Association offered an opportunity to get to know

the people and the issues”.

(Since you “identified most” with Hanalei, why

did you move to Kilauea?)

I can’t address the statements you made about

Kilauea, and this is best left to someone more familiar with that

community.

Most of us love Kaua’i because of its incredible beauty and its

relaxed lifestyle. However, it is apparent that Kaua’i is not a “special

place” to everyone who moves here—as much of their time is spent trying to

make things different. Kaua’i will grow. Hopefully, we can be a part of this

growth process. For those people who don’t find that Kaua’i offers them what

they want—we would hope that they can find a place that does and not criticize

the way of life on Kaua’i! I, personally love KAUAI and the beautiful

community of Princeville!

I would suggest to anyone that read your article

and now thinks the Princeville Center consists of T-shirts and $5 ice cream

cones to come visit one of our stores or any of the other merchants in the

Princeville Center—I think they will be pleasantly surprised!

Lucy Adams

Princeville Merchant and Resident

To the Forum:

Attn: Bill and

Mary Chase:

In your Editorial of April 2, you describe your dislike for

Princeville as a community and its Shopping Center as a viable shopping venue.

You state:

“We are just beginning our eighth year of living on Kaua’i, our

family of four. All of those years we have been on the Northshore, arguably one

of the most beautiful places on the planet, but ALSO A RATHER WEIRD SCENE,

COMMUNITY-WISE.”

( I’ve lived in Princeville for nine years and have never

found this to be anything other than a wonderful place called “home”.)

“We

spent our first five years in Princeville, A SLICE OF SUBURBIA THAT CAN’T

DECIDE IF IT’S A RESORT, A RETIREMENT COMMUNITY, OR A FAMILY

NEIGHBORHOOD”.

(Why you judge a community “a failure” when it is actually

able to be many things is my question).

“To us it never felt like a “real

community”—the kids are bused to Hanalei for school, THE SHOPPING CONSISTS OF

STORES THAT SELL T-SHIRTS AND $5 ICE CREAM CONES. . .”

(This statement

about viable shopping is absolutely not true!)

I find it odd that you don’t

make one “positive statement” about the community of Princeville. Princeville

is safe and clean! Princeville has large, open landscaped and well maintained

spaces with walking paths! Princeville has wonderful golf courses, views and a

new library! Princeville has it’s own water system, and following Iniki, was

one of the few communities on Kaua’i that almost immediately had water!

Princeville enforces its CC&R’s that keep our community beautiful. Not

everyone likes CC&R’s, so people moving here must accept these rules or

choose another community more acceptable to their lifestyle. The Princeville

Shopping Center caters to the Northshore community and its visitors. My

partner and I have spent nine years as retailers in the Princeville Center,

starting with one store and growing to three to meet the shopping needs of the

residents and visitors. If you had taken the time to check out the Shopping

Center you would have found our three stores SanDudes, Pretty Woman and Just

Add Water, as well as other fine merchants!

In SanDudes, we offer one of

the best selections of aloha and casual attire for men, and women on the

northshore along with gift items. We keep our prices competitive because our

goal is to be a “resident choice” for shopping. As a gift back to Kaua’i to

help preserve it for future generations, we donate a portion of our sales to

agencies working with our endangered sea life. Since it appears that you have

never been in SanDudes—shame on you for making such an uneducated evaluation

of what we have to offer!

In 1995 we opened Pretty Woman, with a commitment

to meeting ladies “complete” shopping needs. Pretty Woman stocked items

from—lingerie to wedding gowns. Besides Liberty House, we were the ONLY

complete ladies store on Kaua’i. We drew people from Po’ipu, Kekaha and even

from the neighbor islands. I suspect that even your wife may have shopped at

Pretty Woman. Unfortunately, this store closed in March as this building

undertakes remodeling for the new Princeville Post Office. To fill this void,

we opened “Just Add Water” in the front of the center which offers a quality

selection of washable casual attire, beach wear, accessories and

gifts.

You further state: “During this time (five years in Princeville),

we identified most with the Hanalei community, as our kids went to school there

and the Hanalei Community Association offered an opportunity to get to know

the people and the issues”.

(Since you “identified most” with Hanalei, why

did you move to Kilauea?)

I can’t address the statements you made about

Kilauea, and this is best left to someone more familiar with that

community.

Most of us love Kaua’i because of its incredible beauty and its

relaxed lifestyle. However, it is apparent that Kaua’i is not a “special

place” to everyone who moves here—as much of their time is spent trying to

make things different. Kaua’i will grow. Hopefully, we can be a part of this

growth process. For those people who don’t find that Kaua’i offers them what

they want—we would hope that they can find a place that does and not criticize

the way of life on Kaua’i! I, personally love KAUAI and the beautiful

community of Princeville!

I would suggest to anyone that read your article

and now thinks the Princeville Center consists of T-shirts and $5 ice cream

cones to come visit one of our stores or any of the other merchants in the

Princeville Center—I think they will be pleasantly surprised!

Lucy Adams

Princeville Merchant and Resident

To the Forum:

Attn: Bill and

Mary Chase:

In your Editorial of April 2, you describe your dislike for

Princeville as a community and its Shopping Center as a viable shopping venue.

You state:

“We are just beginning our eighth year of living on Kaua’i, our

family of four. All of those years we have been on the Northshore, arguably one

of the most beautiful places on the planet, but ALSO A RATHER WEIRD SCENE,

COMMUNITY-WISE.”

( I’ve lived in Princeville for nine years and have never

found this to be anything other than a wonderful place called “home”.)

“We

spent our first five years in Princeville, A SLICE OF SUBURBIA THAT CAN’T

DECIDE IF IT’S A RESORT, A RETIREMENT COMMUNITY, OR A FAMILY

NEIGHBORHOOD”.

(Why you judge a community “a failure” when it is actually

able to be many things is my question).

“To us it never felt like a “real

community”—the kids are bused to Hanalei for school, THE SHOPPING CONSISTS OF

STORES THAT SELL T-SHIRTS AND $5 ICE CREAM CONES. . .”

(This statement

about viable shopping is absolutely not true!)

I find it odd that you don’t

make one “positive statement” about the community of Princeville. Princeville

is safe and clean! Princeville has large, open landscaped and well maintained

spaces with walking paths! Princeville has wonderful golf courses, views and a

new library! Princeville has it’s own water system, and following Iniki, was

one of the few communities on Kaua’i that almost immediately had water!

Princeville enforces its CC&R’s that keep our community beautiful. Not

everyone likes CC&R’s, so people moving here must accept these rules or

choose another community more acceptable to their lifestyle. The Princeville

Shopping Center caters to the Northshore community and its visitors. My

partner and I have spent nine years as retailers in the Princeville Center,

starting with one store and growing to three to meet the shopping needs of the

residents and visitors. If you had taken the time to check out the Shopping

Center you would have found our three stores SanDudes, Pretty Woman and Just

Add Water, as well as other fine merchants!

In SanDudes, we offer one of

the best selections of aloha and casual attire for men, and women on the

northshore along with gift items. We keep our prices competitive because our

goal is to be a “resident choice” for shopping. As a gift back to Kaua’i to

help preserve it for future generations, we donate a portion of our sales to

agencies working with our endangered sea life. Since it appears that you have

never been in SanDudes—shame on you for making such an uneducated evaluation

of what we have to offer!

In 1995 we opened Pretty Woman, with a commitment

to meeting ladies “complete” shopping needs. Pretty Woman stocked items

from—lingerie to wedding gowns. Besides Liberty House, we were the ONLY

complete ladies store on Kaua’i. We drew people from Po’ipu, Kekaha and even

from the neighbor islands. I suspect that even your wife may have shopped at

Pretty Woman. Unfortunately, this store closed in March as this building

undertakes remodeling for the new Princeville Post Office. To fill this void,

we opened “Just Add Water” in the front of the center which offers a quality

selection of washable casual attire, beach wear, accessories and

gifts.

You further state: “During this time (five years in Princeville),

we identified most with the Hanalei community, as our kids went to school there

and the Hanalei Community Association offered an opportunity to get to know

the people and the issues”.

(Since you “identified most” with Hanalei, why

did you move to Kilauea?)

I can’t address the statements you made about

Kilauea, and this is best left to someone more familiar with that

community.

Most of us love Kaua’i because of its incredible beauty and its

relaxed lifestyle. However, it is apparent that Kaua’i is not a “special

place” to everyone who moves here—as much of their time is spent trying to

make things different. Kaua’i will grow. Hopefully, we can be a part of this

growth process. For those people who don’t find that Kaua’i offers them what

they want—we would hope that they can find a place that does and not criticize

the way of life on Kaua’i! I, personally love KAUAI and the beautiful

community of Princeville!

I would suggest to anyone that read your article

and now thinks the Princeville Center consists of T-shirts and $5 ice cream

cones to come visit one of our stores or any of the other merchants in the

Princeville Center—I think they will be pleasantly surprised!

Lucy Adams

Princeville Merchant and Resident

To the Forum:

Attn: Bill and

Mary Chase:

In your Editorial of April 2, you describe your dislike for

Princeville as a community and its Shopping Center as a viable shopping venue.

You state:

“We are just beginning our eighth year of living on Kaua’i, our

family of four. All of those years we have been on the Northshore, arguably one

of the most beautiful places on the planet, but ALSO A RATHER WEIRD SCENE,

COMMUNITY-WISE.”

( I’ve lived in Princeville for nine years and have never

found this to be anything other than a wonderful place called “home”.)

“We

spent our first five years in Princeville, A SLICE OF SUBURBIA THAT CAN’T

DECIDE IF IT’S A RESORT, A RETIREMENT COMMUNITY, OR A FAMILY

NEIGHBORHOOD”.

(Why you judge a community “a failure” when it is actually

able to be many things is my question).

“To us it never felt like a “real

community”—the kids are bused to Hanalei for school, THE SHOPPING CONSISTS OF

STORES THAT SELL T-SHIRTS AND $5 ICE CREAM CONES. . .”

(This statement

about viable shopping is absolutely not true!)

I find it odd that you don’t

make one “positive statement” about the community of Princeville. Princeville

is safe and clean! Princeville has large, open landscaped and well maintained

spaces with walking paths! Princeville has wonderful golf courses, views and a

new library! Princeville has it’s own water system, and following Iniki, was

one of the few communities on Kaua’i that almost immediately had water!

Princeville enforces its CC&R’s that keep our community beautiful. Not

everyone likes CC&R’s, so people moving here must accept these rules or

choose another community more acceptable to their lifestyle. The Princeville

Shopping Center caters to the Northshore community and its visitors. My

partner and I have spent nine years as retailers in the Princeville Center,

starting with one store and growing to three to meet the shopping needs of the

residents and visitors. If you had taken the time to check out the Shopping

Center you would have found our three stores SanDudes, Pretty Woman and Just

Add Water, as well as other fine merchants!

In SanDudes, we offer one of

the best selections of aloha and casual attire for men, and women on the

northshore along with gift items. We keep our prices competitive because our

goal is to be a “resident choice” for shopping. As a gift back to Kaua’i to

help preserve it for future generations, we donate a portion of our sales to

agencies working with our endangered sea life. Since it appears that you have

never been in SanDudes—shame on you for making such an uneducated evaluation

of what we have to offer!

In 1995 we opened Pretty Woman, with a commitment

to meeting ladies “complete” shopping needs. Pretty Woman stocked items

from—lingerie to wedding gowns. Besides Liberty House, we were the ONLY

complete ladies store on Kaua’i. We drew people from Po’ipu, Kekaha and even

from the neighbor islands. I suspect that even your wife may have shopped at

Pretty Woman. Unfortunately, this store closed in March as this building

undertakes remodeling for the new Princeville Post Office. To fill this void,

we opened “Just Add Water” in the front of the center which offers a quality

selection of washable casual attire, beach wear, accessories and

gifts.

You further state: “During this time (five years in Princeville),

we identified most with the Hanalei community, as our kids went to school there

and the Hanalei Community Association offered an opportunity to get to know

the people and the issues”.

(Since you “identified most” with Hanalei, why

did you move to Kilauea?)

I can’t address the statements you made about

Kilauea, and this is best left to someone more familiar with that

community.

Most of us love Kaua’i because of its incredible beauty and its

relaxed lifestyle. However, it is apparent that Kaua’i is not a “special

place” to everyone who moves here—as much of their time is spent trying to

make things different. Kaua’i will grow. Hopefully, we can be a part of this

growth process. For those people who don’t find that Kaua’i offers them what

they want—we would hope that they can find a place that does and not criticize

the way of life on Kaua’i! I, personally love KAUAI and the beautiful

community of Princeville!

I would suggest to anyone that read your article

and now thinks the Princeville Center consists of T-shirts and $5 ice cream

cones to come visit one of our stores or any of the other merchants in the

Princeville Center—I think they will be pleasantly surprised!

Lucy Adams

Princeville Merchant and Resident

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