Churches join forces … to drywall

LIHU’E – Over a dozen Protestant Kaua’i churches are joining forces with almost

four dozen volunteers from Georgia this week for a week of evangelism and

construction.

Plans call for three nights of meetings that began last night

at the War Memorial Convention Center, followed by a dramatic presentation on

Sunday night – all put on by members of Outreach America, a ministry of an

Atlanta-based church.

The visitors arrived on Wednesday and brought their

work clothes along and plan to drywall the interior of the new Aloha Church

ministry center in Lihu’e.

A drama titled “The Pretenders” on Sunday

night June 18 at 6:00 p.m. at the Kauai War Memorial Convention Hall.

“The

theme of the play is people who are pretending to be one thing, but are

actually another, and is aimed by churchgoers and the world in general,” said

Pastor Troy Shaw of Celebration Church in Atlanta, the founder and leader of

Outreach America.

Shaw is the senior pastor of the multi-racial

congregation of 285 members, and has made six ministry trips to Kaua’i over the

past four years.

Shaw said his attraction to Kaua’i came through a call for

help, rather than through a picturesque travel photo of the Island.

“I

called the Assembly of God headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, and they said

it was hard to get teams to come to Hawai’i because of its tourism image,” Shaw

said.

His team is one of hundreds traveling out to churches across the

United States who each year help other churches with construction projects, do

short-term relief work in poverty areas, do street evangelism and other “good

works.”

“It’s hard to recruit teams to come to Hawai’i because of vacation

image,” Shaw said, “that’s why we keep coming. We get some ridicule back in

Atlanta, because of this.”

He said the visit took nine months to plan, and

includes a choir of skilled musicians and singers, a “Celebration Station” kids

team who will put on a vacation Bible school at the Aloha Church, and a unique

puppetry team that uses a black-light puppet.

“All things considered I

believe that our visit will be quite profitable for the local folks of Kaua’i,”

Shaw said.

Members pay their own way on the self-supporting missions.

Shaw said his Kaua’i team has each paid over $1,200 for air tickets and

accommodations. They’ll buy food and other items while on island with their own

pocket money.

“Tradesmen paid their own way and are taking their own

vacation time,” he said. “We have two or three general contractors, and other

skilled technicians. The focus is the drywall work, a key phase in the ongoing

project.”

Joining Outreach America in putting on the four nights of

ministry and drama at the Kauai War Memorial Convention Hall are: Church of

the First Born, Kapaa Assembly of God, Kauai International Christian

Fellowship, Kilauea Christian Fellowship, Kauai Island Ministries, ‘Ele’ele

Baptist Church, Kapaa Missionary Church, Kauai Bible Church, Lihue Christian

Church, The Way of Salvation Church, Garden Island Church of the Nazarene,

Garden Isle Church of God, Koloa Missionary Church, Thy Word Ministries, Kapaa

Baptist Church, King’s Chapel Assembly of God, Lift Jesus Higher, and Hope

Chapel.

Shaw said the Sunday night drama team is part of what his church

calls “Sunday Night Live.” He said the church runs about 15 ministries in their

community on a regular basis.

“We’ve changed the whole outlook of church

ministries, we want to go out and touch people, empty the sanctuary, hit the

streets,” Shaw said.

He said his church has seen 800 conversions since New

Year’s through their outreach ministries.

“Sunday night attendance has

tripled from 40-50 to just under 200,” he said. “We credit that to ministries.”

“That’s the purpose behind the evangelism conference,” he said. “It’s not

to tell you what to do, but to tell you this is what’s working for us. It’s got

nothing to do with denominational affiliation, but everything to do with

fulfilling the Great Commission, that’s where the beauty is in having 19

churches to come together. It’s a time for all the churches to come together

and work for the common cause.”

By CHRIS COOK

New Media

Manager

LIHU’E — Over a dozen Protestant Kaua’i churches are joining

forces with almost four dozen volunteers from Georgia this week for a week of

evangelism and construction.

Plans call for three nights of meetings that

began last night at the War Memorial Convention Center, followed by a dramatic

presentation on Sunday night – all put on by members of Outreach America, a

ministry of an Atlanta-based church.

The visitors arrived on Wednesday and

brought their work clothes along and plan to drywall the interior of the new

Aloha Church ministry center in Lihu’e.

A drama titled “The

Pretenders” on Sunday night June 18 at 6:00 p.m. at the Kauai War Memorial

Convention Hall.

“The theme of the play is people who are pretending to be

one thing, but are actually another, and is aimed by churchgoers and the world

in general,” said Pastor Troy Shaw of Celebration Church in Atlanta, the

founder and leader of Outreach America.

Shaw is the senior pastor of the

multi-racial congregation of 285 members, and has made six ministry trips to

Kaua’i over the past four years.

Shaw said his attraction to Kaua’i came

through a call for help, rather than through a picturesque travel photo of the

Island.

“I called the Assembly of God headquarters in Springfield,

Missouri, and they said it was hard to get teams to come to Hawai’i because of

its tourism image,” Shaw said.

His team is one of hundreds traveling out to

churches across the United States who each year help other churches with

construction projects, do short-term relief work in poverty areas, do street

evangelism and other “good works.”

“It’s hard to recruit teams to come to

Hawai’i because of vacation image,” Shaw said, “that’s why we keep coming. We

get some ridicule back in Atlanta, because of this.”

He said the visit took

nine months to plan, and includes a choir of skilled musicians and singers, a

“Celebration Station” kids team who will put on a vacation Bible school at the

Aloha Church, and a unique puppetry team that uses a black-light

puppet.

“All things considered I believe that our visit will be quite

profitable for the local folks of Kaua’i,” Shaw said.

Members pay their own

way on the self-supporting missions.

Shaw said his Kaua’i team has each

paid over $1,200 for air tickets and accommodations. They’ll buy food and other

items while on island with their own pocket money.

“Tradesmen paid their

own way and are taking their own vacation time,” he said. “We have two or three

general contractors, and other skilled technicians. The focus is the drywall

work, a key phase in the ongoing project.”

Joining Outreach America in

putting on the four nights of ministry and drama at the Kauai War Memorial

Convention Hall are: Church of the First Born, Kapaa Assembly of God, Kauai

International Christian Fellowship, Kilauea Christian Fellowship, Kauai Island

Ministries, ‘Ele’ele Baptist Church, Kapaa Missionary Church, Kauai Bible

Church, Lihue Christian Church, The Way of Salvation Church, Garden Island

Church of the Nazarene, Garden Isle Church of God, Koloa Missionary Church, Thy

Word Ministries, Kapaa Baptist Church, King’s Chapel Assembly of God, Lift

Jesus Higher, and Hope Chapel.

Shaw said the Sunday night drama team is

part of what his church calls “Sunday Night Live.” He said the church runs

about 15 ministries in their community on a regular basis.

“We’ve changed

the whole outlook of church ministries, we want to go out and touch people,

empty the sanctuary, hit the streets,” Shaw said.

He said his church has

seen 800 conversions since New Year’s through their outreach ministries.

“Sunday night attendance has tripled from 40-50 to just under 200,” he

said. “We credit that to ministries.”

“That’s the purpose behind the

evangelism conference,” he said. “It’s not to tell you what to do, but to tell

you this is what’s working for us. It’s got nothing to do with denominational

affiliation, but everything to do with fulfilling the Great Commission, that’s

where the beauty is in having 19 churches to come together. It’s a time for all

the churches to come together and work for the common cause.”

By CHRIS

COOK

New Media Manager

LIHU’E — Over a dozen Protestant Kaua’i

churches are joining forces with almost four dozen volunteers from Georgia this

week for a week of evangelism and construction.

Plans call for three nights

of meetings that began last night at the War Memorial Convention Center,

followed by a dramatic presentation on Sunday night – all put on by members of

Outreach America, a ministry of an Atlanta-based church.

The visitors

arrived on Wednesday and brought their work clothes along and plan to drywall

the interior of the new Aloha Church ministry center in Lihu’e.

A drama

titled “The Pretenders” on Sunday night June 18 at 6:00 p.m. at the Kauai War

Memorial Convention Hall.

“The theme of the play is people who are

pretending to be one thing, but are actually another, and is aimed by

churchgoers and the world in general,” said Pastor Troy Shaw of Celebration

Church in Atlanta, the founder and leader of Outreach America.

Shaw is the

senior pastor of the multi-racial congregation of 285 members, and has made six

ministry trips to Kaua’i over the past four years.

Shaw said his attraction

to Kaua’i came through a call for help, rather than through a picturesque

travel photo of the Island.

“I called the Assembly of God headquarters in

Springfield, Missouri, and they said it was hard to get teams to come to

Hawai’i because of its tourism image,” Shaw said.

His team is one of

hundreds traveling out to churches across the United States who each year help

other churches with construction projects, do short-term relief work in poverty

areas, do street evangelism and other “good works.”

“It’s hard to recruit

teams to come to Hawai’i because of vacation image,” Shaw said, “that’s why we

keep coming. We get some ridicule back in Atlanta, because of this.”

He

said the visit took nine months to plan, and includes a choir of skilled

musicians and singers, a “Celebration Station” kids team who will put on a

vacation Bible school at the Aloha Church, and a unique puppetry team that uses

a black-light puppet.

“All things considered I believe that our visit will

be quite profitable for the local folks of Kaua’i,” Shaw said.

Members pay

their own way on the self-supporting missions.

Shaw said his Kaua’i team

has each paid over $1,200 for air tickets and accommodations. They’ll buy food

and other items while on island with their own pocket money.

“Tradesmen

paid their own way and are taking their own vacation time,” he said. “We have

two or three general contractors, and other skilled technicians. The focus is

the drywall work, a key phase in the ongoing project.”

Joining Outreach

America in putting on the four nights of ministry and drama at the Kauai War

Memorial Convention Hall are: Church of the First Born, Kapaa Assembly of God,

Kauai International Christian Fellowship, Kilauea Christian Fellowship, Kauai

Island Ministries, ‘Ele’ele Baptist Church, Kapaa Missionary Church, Kauai

Bible Church, Lihue Christian Church, The Way of Salvation Church, Garden

Island Church of the Nazarene, Garden Isle Church of God, Koloa Missionary

Church, Thy Word Ministries, Kapaa Baptist Church, King’s Chapel Assembly of

God, Lift Jesus Higher, and Hope Chapel.

Shaw said the Sunday night drama

team is part of what his church calls “Sunday Night Live.” He said the church

runs about 15 ministries in their community on a regular basis.

“We’ve

changed the whole outlook of church ministries, we want to go out and touch

people, empty the sanctuary, hit the streets,” Shaw said.

He said his

church has seen 800 conversions since New Year’s through their outreach

ministries.

“Sunday night attendance has tripled from 40-50 to just under

200,” he said. “We credit that to ministries.”

“That’s the purpose behind

the evangelism conference,” he said. “It’s not to tell you what to do, but to

tell you this is what’s working for us. It’s got nothing to do with

denominational affiliation, but everything to do with fulfilling the Great

Commission, that’s where the beauty is in having 19 churches to come together.

It’s a time for all the churches to come together and work for the common

cause.”

By CHRIS COOK

New Media Manager

LIHU’E — Over a dozen

Protestant Kaua’i churches are joining forces with almost four dozen volunteers

from Georgia this week for a week of evangelism and construction.

Plans

call for three nights of meetings that began last night at the War Memorial

Convention Center, followed by a dramatic presentation on Sunday night – all

put on by members of Outreach America, a ministry of an Atlanta-based

church.

The visitors arrived on Wednesday and brought their work clothes

along and plan to drywall the interior of the new Aloha Church ministry center

in Lihu’e.

A drama titled “The Pretenders” on Sunday night June 18 at

6:00 p.m. at the Kauai War Memorial Convention Hall.

“The theme of the play

is people who are pretending to be one thing, but are actually another, and is

aimed by churchgoers and the world in general,” said Pastor Troy Shaw of

Celebration Church in Atlanta, the founder and leader of Outreach

America.

Shaw is the senior pastor of the multi-racial congregation of 285

members, and has made six ministry trips to Kaua’i over the past four

years.

Shaw said his attraction to Kaua’i came through a call for help,

rather than through a picturesque travel photo of the Island.

“I called the

Assembly of God headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, and they said it was

hard to get teams to come to Hawai’i because of its tourism image,” Shaw

said.

His team is one of hundreds traveling out to churches across the

United States who each year help other churches with construction projects, do

short-term relief work in poverty areas, do street evangelism and other “good

works.”

“It’s hard to recruit teams to come to Hawai’i because of vacation

image,” Shaw said, “that’s why we keep coming. We get some ridicule back in

Atlanta, because of this.”

He said the visit took nine months to plan, and

includes a choir of skilled musicians and singers, a “Celebration Station” kids

team who will put on a vacation Bible school at the Aloha Church, and a unique

puppetry team that uses a black-light puppet.

“All things considered I

believe that our visit will be quite profitable for the local folks of Kaua’i,”

Shaw said.

Members pay their own way on the self-supporting missions.

Shaw said his Kaua’i team has each paid over $1,200 for air tickets and

accommodations. They’ll buy food and other items while on island with their own

pocket money.

“Tradesmen paid their own way and are taking their own

vacation time,” he said. “We have two or three general contractors, and other

skilled technicians. The focus is the drywall work, a key phase in the ongoing

project.”

Joining Outreach America in putting on the four nights of

ministry and drama at the Kauai War Memorial Convention Hall are: Church of

the First Born, Kapaa Assembly of God, Kauai International Christian

Fellowship, Kilauea Christian Fellowship, Kauai Island Ministries, ‘Ele’ele

Baptist Church, Kapaa Missionary Church, Kauai Bible Church, Lihue Christian

Church, The Way of Salvation Church, Garden Island Church of the Nazarene,

Garden Isle Church of God, Koloa Missionary Church, Thy Word Ministries, Kapaa

Baptist Church, King’s Chapel Assembly of God, Lift Jesus Higher, and Hope

Chapel.

Shaw said the Sunday night drama team is part of what his church

calls “Sunday Night Live.” He said the church runs about 15 ministries in their

community on a regular basis.

“We’ve changed the whole outlook of church

ministries, we want to go out and touch people, empty the sanctuary, hit the

streets,” Shaw said.

He said his church has seen 800 conversions since New

Year’s through their outreach ministries.

“Sunday night attendance has

tripled from 40-50 to just under 200,” he said. “We credit that to ministries.”

“That’s the purpose behind the evangelism conference,” he said. “It’s not

to tell you what to do, but to tell you this is what’s working for us. It’s got

nothing to do with denominational affiliation, but everything to do with

fulfilling the Great Commission, that’s where the beauty is in having 19

churches to come together. It’s a time for all the churches to come together

and work for the common cause.”

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