Wa I Hala: from the files of The Garden Island

80 Years AgoFrom the June 8, 1920 issue

HOMEGROWN TALENT – The high tide of dramatic enterprise for Lihu’e was

certainly attained last Saturday night in the presentation of “Green Stockings”

at the Tip Top theater.

The play is an ambitious one, of more than usual

interest and quality depicting English life and character and turning on the

old English custom which requires green stockings for the old maid daughter,

who does not get married in her proper turn. VISITOR FROM AFRICA – Mr. C.

Hornung, a sugar planter of the Zambesi River region, East Africa, who is

making a tour of the principal sugar countries of the world, was on Kaua’i last

week looking over the sugar interests and developments here.

As a result of

what he has seen on Hawai’i and elsewhere, he is going back to Africa to

inaugurate a new order of things.

PLANTING FISH – The 50,000 Rainbow

trout eggs which were arranged for some time ago, arrived last Friday under the

care of I. H. Wilson, who took them to the upper regions of Puukopele Park

where he will superintend the hatching of the same.

The experiment will be

watched with a great deal of interest by the fish commission, as well as by

sportsmen throughout the territory.

ALL WET – Last Thursday evening as

the Kinau was rounding Kaena Point a sailing vessel was signed showing signs of

distress. Captain Gregory changed his course so as to bring his ship alongside

the distressed vessel and found it was the Annie e, and that she was in an

almost sinking condition on account of having sprung a leak.

The crew of

the vessel had been at the pumps until they were almost exhausted and it is

said, they could not have remained afloat much longer.

Although handicapped

on account of having no deck hands, Captain Gregory maneuvered his vessel

alongside the stricken s hip and succeeded in getting his lines aboard, and

towed her back to the entrance of Honolulu harbor.

NABBED – Additional

evidence was unearthed last week to indicate that the police have probably in

custody the murderer of Oshiro, or Ohgusuku, the Japanese laborer who was

waylaid on the homestead road on May 27th.

A 38 Caliber “Colt” automatic

with one loaded shell in the chamber and which was identical with the two empty

shells found near the scene of the tragedy was located accidentally by officer

Isaac Kalu. The officer had gone to the prisoner’s house to supoena a witness

in connection with the same case and while waiting for his man, noticed that

one section of the thick hau bushes in the back of the house had been recently

cut. His suspicions aroused, he went through the cut and found, lying neatly

wrapped up in a pillow case, a 38 caliber Colt Automatic. The number of the

revolver was traced and found to have been registered in the name of J.C. Soto,

a Porto Rican homesteader, who had reported the loss of the weapon to the

police about a month ago.

Two or three men arrested last week have been

released but are under surveillance. The other is probably the right man, as

the initials “P.P.” on the pillow case with which the revolver was wrapped is

reported by the police to the correct initials of the

prisoner.

SHORTED HANDED – The Inter-Island steamer Kaiulani arrived

at Ahukini Saturday morning with a load of coal for Lihue Plantation. She came

exceedingly short handed-only one proper sailor, with two other make-shift deck

hands.

In order to get the coal ashore and the sugar aboard, the plantation

had to furnish a shore crew, who however would not undertake the job for

anything less than a dollar an hour.

FAREWELL DANCE – The Imperial

Orchestra, the popular Lihu’e musical organization, will give a dance at the

armory on the evening of Saturday, June 26th, in honor of the Kaua’i teachers

who will be departing at the end of the school year.

66 Years

Ago

From the June 4, 1934 issue

BIRD IN THE HAND – Four big prizes

will be awarded to winners in the Kaua’i rice bird eradication campaign, which

began on April 1 and will end on Oct. 31. These are one ton of fertilizer from

the Pacific Guano & Fertilizer co. in Honolulu for the first prize, $15

merchandise from Lihue Store for the second prize, and $10 in merchandise from

the Hanama’ulu Store for the third prize.

ROUGH TRIP – Captain Thomas

Drake, who visited Kaua’i in April was reported having suffered a broken right

hand and a sprained arm from being caught in the wheel of his vessel Progress

in a storm during his recent trip to the coast. He was taken to a hospital upon

his arrival last Tuesday in Seattle.

Captain Drake stated that he fought

rough seas and gales for 20 days of the 53 he was on the ocean from

Honolulu.

SMOOTH RIDE – A 28-passenger International bussed has

replaced the former Studebaker bus owned by D. Yamaguchi who operates the car

on the west side daily. Passengers on the new bus claim a better service and a

smoother ride and the owner feels fully compensated.

STELLAR VISITOR –

Polly Moran Malone, famous screen star, and a party of other tourists, were

guests of Francis I. Brown at his beach house at Haena last Thursday and

Friday.

STILL ON THE LAMB – the epidemic of petty burglaries on the

west side remained unchecked when an attempted burglary was made at the T.

Uyeno Store at Waimea last Monday night.

After locking the store for the

night at about 9:30 Uyeno and his family retired to their residence located at

the rear of the sore.

Half an hour later the ten year old son of Uyeno

happened to go out to the porch. To his surprise he was a burglar trying to

enter the store through a side window. He quickly notified his father and an

alarm was given. Before anyone would get a good glimpse of him the burglar had

fled. The Waimea police force was quickly notified but as yet no arrest has

been made.

39 Years Ago

From the June 7, 1961

issue

CASTING CALL- Local casting will take place at Kaua’i Inn on

Friday afternoon for the movie “Seven Women,” which will be filmed started next

week.

Mr. Parmenter said the company is looking for the following types of

bit players and extras:

Good Japanese types for soldier parts; New Guinea

natives; eight or nine small children (“They can’t be fat because this is a

prison camp story,” Mr. Paramenter said): ten or fifteen haole girls

“preferable English or Dutch types for an international flavor and couple of

Englishmen.

Ceasar Romero has been chosen for the male lead in the picture

about New Guinea in the early days of World War II

KEY RANSOM –

Yoshika Ishii, 39, of Lihu’e, posted bail of $2 to recover his car keys after

they were taken from his parked car by policeman Charles Manoi on May 29. The

car was parked in front of Chica’s on Rice St. in Lihue.

ANOTHER

WAYWARD KEY – Charles t. Crane, 33, of Kapa’a forfeited bail of $2 on an

ignition key violation charge in Lihu’e district court Tuesday. He was cited on

Rice Street in Lihu’e by officer Charles Manoi on May 29.

COLLAPSING –

Two years ago “The Shack” in Lydgate Park, near the Wailua river mouth, was

given to the County after being constructed for filming a TV sequence in “The

Beachcomber.” But time and lack of maintenance took their toll, until it

started to collapse. County men posted the danger signs, warning children not

to risk being caught in a collapse. But it was ordered demolished and the

lumber salvaged, in view of the dangerous condition.

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, send us an email.