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Letters for Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Don’t sweat the small stuff

Recently, a couple of small business owners, dutiful Kauai taxpayers, and advocates of philanthropy and exercise, were told that a colorful, artistic mural, which was painted on private property, was inappropriate and forced to remove said painting.

Apparently, the Kapaa bike path is an appropriate place for daylight meth deals, passed out heroin addicts, squatter encampments, and overflowing uncollected garbage, yet not for art.

Ironically, many concerned citizens with power in the correct places are in a rush to dictate what positive, contributing members of this community can or can’t do, meanwhile turning a blind eye to the very real problems our Kapaa community faces.

I suggest that instead of wasting time and recourses on petty differences in taste, we support our small business owners, and focus much needed attention on the real “eyesores”of Kapaa.

Stefanie Stauber, Kapaa

Kanoho, KVB do good job, have heart for Kauai

This letter is in response to Steve Martin’s “Other Voices,” column on Feb. 3. First of all, I must state that I agree with Mr. Martin about being very concerned about the huge increase in tourism on our island and the negative impacts this has had on our environment and the quality of life on Kauai.

What I object to is Steve’s disparaging accusations that Sue Kanoho, executive director of the Kauai Visitor’s Bureau, is “blinded by all the money” and fails to realize the impact of tourism on our island.

I know Sue and have worked with her in a couple of different contexts. She is very aware and definitely concerned about these issues and is diligently working to help bring alternative clean industry to Kauai that will serve our economy and offer residents (especially our youth who are leaving in droves) alternative career choices to tourism.

Sue has been assisting the Creative Industries Division, a state agency that serves as “a business advocate for Hawaii’s culture, arts, music, film, publishing, digital and new media industries, supporting initiatives, policy and infrastructure development to expand the capacity of Hawaii’s creative entrepreneurs.”

This division is bringing some amazing opportunities to Kauai this year through Creative Lab Hawaii. Michael Andres Palmieri, executive director, was honored last month by The Hawaii Senate and House of Representatives for the spectacular success of this program.

There were times when we really needed and were very grateful for everything Sue and others did to encourage tourism. Remember the aftermaths of Hurricane Iniki and the economic recession of 2007? Well, guess what, they did an amazing job! Their work along with various economic factors have created such a boom in tourism that we now need to diversify and encourage alternative industry that will serve our beautiful island environment, all of our communities and everything that we all love about Kauai.

Going forward letter and editorial writers, please, let’s focus on what needs to be done to accomplish constructive goals rather than look for targets to blame for the problems. There are many, many people on this island who care and are more than willing to do what is necessary to work for the benefit for all. Let’s find those people and help empower them in whatever way we can.

Nadya Wynd, Wailua

3 Comments
  1. gordon oswald February 6, 2018 8:23 am Reply

    Sorry Nadya. Your comment is appreciated, but naïve. I’ve met Sue and she is a very nice person doing a good job at getting people from all over the world to descend on our Island and bring their money. You also have to face reality. During the hurricane there was a real need, while the Island can support the people coming there is a need. There is no “need” now, and hasn’t been for quite some time!! She can not stop, however, because “it’s her job not to stop”! That is what’s wrong!


  2. Steve martin February 6, 2018 1:04 pm Reply

    Ms. Wynd…. You totally missed my point. I don’t have time right now to explain. More when I have a chance. Thank you.


  3. Steve Martin February 6, 2018 6:39 pm Reply

    Ms. Wynd…. You were doing good real good with the first two sentences of your letter,but then you go on this rant about how you want to protect Sue and the wonderful things she is doing through other state agencies to bring alternative jobs so our children can have careers and not have to work two or three jobs in the tourism industry.. The problem is Sue works for George And it’s time the HTA quits spending millions on convincing people to vacation on Kauai. The world knows all about Kauai and I doubt that people will stop coming here if HTA stops spending and advertising. And if they did we can deserve a break from it. Everything you said about your friend and co-worker has nothing to do with my letter. If she wasn’t in charge of the HTA on Kauai I wouldn’t have brought up her name, but since you did and you informed me of all the wonderful things she does that has nothing to do with what I wrote I can tell you from experience that there is a side to her that is rude and not as wonderful as you may think. Hate to break your bubble. Please next time read my lettersfor what they are and not for what you think it should have said. The problems I expressed are real and what you describe is not going to fix our roads, traffic congestion, over crowding, outdoor lines in plenty of restaurants, 20 people deep trying to get out of safeway market, going to Kea beach at 6:00am and find no parking, to just name a few. And believe it or not nothing Sue is doing for tourism is make the quality of life better for those living here on Kauai. Thank you for your time here.


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